GPA MARKS BUSIEST JUNE, RECORD YEAR

GPA marks busiest June, record year

 

SIX NEW SHIP-TO-SHORE CRANES APPROVED

Friday, July 21, 2017

 
 
 

The Georgia Ports Authority has on order 10 new ship-to-shore cranes that will dramatically increase vessel loading capacity at Garden City Terminal to 1,300 containers per hour – more than any other single terminal in North America. Find print quality images here. (GPA photo)

 

Savannah, Ga. – July 24, 2017 – At its July board meeting, the Georgia Ports Authority reported record fiscal year results and approved the purchase of six new ship-to-shore cranes. 

In FY2017, the GPA moved an all-time high of 3.85 million twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 6.7 percent, or 242,221 TEUs over the previous year. In the last half of FY2017 alone, the Port of Savannah handled an impressive 1.99 million TEUs, for a growth rate of 11.6 percent over the same period in FY2016.

“We could not have achieved this record-breaking year without the hard work and outstanding dedication of our employees,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Our volume growth continues to outpace forecasted demand. Shipping lines are moving 13,000- and 14,000-TEU vessels into service on the East Coast more quickly than anticipated, and concentrating their deliveries at efficient gateway ports like Savannah. This new crane purchase, along with the four already on order, will enable GPA to increase crane capacity by nearly 40 percent.”

The Georgia Ports Authority capped a record fiscal year with its busiest June ever, moving 337,710 twenty-foot equivalent container units, for growth of 17 percent for the month. In Fiscal Year 2017, the GPA moved 33.4 million tons of cargo across all terminals, another all-time high and an 8.3 percent increase over FY2016. 

“Phenomenal cargo growth on this scale is made possible by the strong partnership we enjoy with the International Longshoremen’s Association, the unwavering support of Gov. Nathan Deal and the General Assembly, and the confidence our customers have in Georgia’s ports,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood.

At the meeting Monday, the board approved $72.75 million to purchase six more Neopanamax ship-to-shore cranes. The new machines will arrive in 2020, and are in addition to a previous order of four cranes that will be operational in June of next year. The combined 10 additional cranes will bring the fleet to 36, able to move more than 1,300 containers per hour across a single dock – a capacity unmatched by any other single terminal in North America.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy.

 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

TRILATERAL AGRICULTURE MEETINGS IN SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Joint Statement of Secretary Perdue (U.S.), Minister Lawrence MacAulay (Canada) & Secretary Calzada (Mexico) Regarding Trilateral Agriculture Meetings in Savannah, Georgia

JOINT STATEMENT OF SECRETARY PERDUE (U.S.), MINISTER LAWRENCE MACAULAY (CANADA) & SECRETARY CALZADA (MEXICO) REGARDING TRILATERAL AGRICULTURE MEETINGS IN SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (center) along with counterparts, Agriculture Minister for Canada Lawrence MacAulay (center, right) and the Secretary of Agriculture for Mexico José Calzada (right) — observe ship-to-shore operations on the CMA CGM vessel Lyra at the Port of Savannah, Ga. The Lyra has a capacity of more than 11,000 twenty-foot container units. The trio were hosted by Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch (second from left) and GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood, Tuesday, June 20, 2017, in Savannah, Ga. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority Photo/Stephen B. Morton) 
 Release No. 0062.17
Contact: USDA Press
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Emailpress@oc.usda.gov
Contact: Canada Media Relations
Phone: (613) 773-7972
Emailmedia.relations@agr.gc.ca
Contact: Mexico Communications
Emailfrancisco.vallejo@sagarpa.gob.mx
Joint Statement of Secretary Perdue (U.S.), Minister Lawrence MacAulay (Canada) & Secretary Calzada (Mexico) 
Regarding Trilateral Agriculture Meetings in Savannah, Georgia
 
SAVANNAH, GA, June 20, 2017 – Canadian Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Lawrence MacAulay; Mexican Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food Jose Calzada; and United States Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement at the conclusion of their first trilateral meetings in Savannah, GA, June 19-20, 2017.

 

“Our three nations are connected not only geographically, but through our deeply integrated agricultural markets. Our trading relationship is vital to the economies – and the people – of our respective countries. We are working together to support and create good jobs in all three countries. We share a commitment to keeping our markets open and transparent so that trade can continue to grow. That mutual commitment was reaffirmed in our discussions this week.

 

“The North American Free Trade Agreement has greatly helped our respective agricultural sectors as well as our consumers who have benefitted from an ever-growing variety of safe, affordable food products all year around. While even the best trading partnerships face challenges from time to time, our agricultural differences are relatively few in the context of the $85 billion in agricultural trade that flows between our three nations each year.

 

“Over the years, the United States, Mexico, and Canada have also worked collaboratively to protect plant and animal health, conduct joint research, and share best practices. These efforts have helped to eradicate several pests and diseases from the region, differentiating us from the rest of the world. Our three countries remain committed to continued collaboration to ensure a safe and reliable regional supply chain that makes the North American agriculture sector more competitive.

 

“Our visit to Georgia fostered the mutual understanding and personal relationships that will help North American agriculture thrive, improve our regional partnership and collaboration, and strengthen our trading relationship.”

GEORGIA PORTS AUTHORITY BREAKS CONTAINER VOLUME RECORD

Georgia Ports Authority breaks container volume record

 

ADDITIONAL SHIPPING SERVICES AND STRONG ECONOMY BUILD MOMENTUM FOR SAVANNAH

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

 

 

More than 9,500 TEUs were moved on and off of the OOCL France, one of two 13,000-plus TEU vessels to call the Port of Savannah within 21 days. The arrival of larger vessels, including the OOCL France, contributed to a record-breaking month for the Georgia Ports Authority. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority)

 

Savannah, Ga. — June 6, 2017 Larger vessels and additional container services calling Georgia’s ports coupled with a positive economic forecast ushered in an all-time record month for container volume. The Georgia Ports Authority handled 350,104 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in May, 11.68 % more TEUs compared to the same month a year ago, or 36,619 additional TEUs.

“It’s evident shipping lines are deploying larger vessels and cargo exchanges through the Panama Canal to Georgia’s ports,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “This is a strong indicator that an important market share shift to Georgia is possible through recently restructured shipping services.”

Garden City Terminal received 1,676 vessel calls between July 2016 and May 2017 of which 454 transited the expanded Panama Canal. This led to a 16% increase in throughput during that 11-month period via the Panama Canal at Garden City Terminal.

Lynch said the recent calls of 13,000-plus TEU vessels — the COSCO Development and OOCL France — demonstrate how efficiently larger vessels are served by the GPA. He noted the vessels play to the strengths of Garden City’s single terminal operation, which include an unmatched 1,200-acre complex, 26 ship-to-shore cranes, nine container berths and on-terminal service by two Class I rail providers.

These advantages at Garden City Terminal allowed crews to move more than 19,000 TEUs from these two 13,000-plus TEU vessels, which called the Port of Savannah just 21 days apart.

“The GPA’s continued on-terminal investment along with the state of Georgia’s off-terminal improvements will allow GPA to serve vessels well beyond 13,000 TEUs,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood.

On April 1, shipping lines realigned to form massive alliances. These new rotations signal more 13,000-plus TEU vessels are heading for Georgia’s ports. Since the realignment, 35 weekly container services call Garden City Terminal, more than any other port on the U.S. East Coast.

“Our record-breaking performance in May with no congestion or operational issues gave our customers increased confidence in Georgia’s ports,” Lynch said. “This proves the GPA can simultaneously serve larger vessels and greater volumes while providing the excellent logistic solutions our customers have come to expect.”

 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GPA TO USE ELECTRIC CRANES AT APPALACHIAN REGIONAL PORT

GPA to use electric cranes at Appalachian Regional Port

 

QUIET, CLEAN-RUNNING CRANES CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE OPERATION

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

 
 

The electric rubber-tired gantry cranes at the Appalachian Regional Port will be similar to those used in Savannah (above). The transition to eRTGs is part of a series of GPA initiatives designed to increase productivity and capacity in environmentally responsible ways. Through efforts such as electrifying ship-to-shore cranes and refrigerated container racks, the Port of Savannah avoids the use of more than 5.4 million gallons of diesel annually. Find print quality images here. (GPA photo)

 

Savannah, Ga. – May 24, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority Board on Monday approved the purchase of three electric rubber-tired gantry cranes for the Appalachian Regional Port in Chatsworth. 

“The eRTGs provide the most efficient method for completing container moves on terminal,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “These machines will lessen the impact of our operations on the surrounding community by running quieter, and by virtually eliminating diesel emissions.”

The ARP, an inland port to be operated by the GPA, will open additional markets across Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky. On 42 acres in Northwest Georgia’s Murray County, the site will feature on-terminal rail service from CSX Transportation. The location is adjacent to U.S. 411 and features easy access to Interstate 75. The facility will handle import, export and domestic cargo.

The electric cranes to be used at the inland terminal will reduce fuel consumption by more than 95 percent per crane. The Georgia Ports Authority received a 2016 EPA Clean Air Excellence Award for its eRTG program, which virtually eliminates emissions of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter compared to diesel-powered RTGs.

Other environmental benefits come from reduced truck miles. The inland port model allows exports to be trucked for shorter distances and staged at the intermodal yard, where they are loaded onto trains moving hundreds of containers in a single trip.

Also at the GPA board meeting Monday, Lynch reported that construction at the Appalachian Regional Port is more than 10 percent complete. The 40-acre inland terminal in Northwest Georgia is expected to open in summer 2018.

Through improved access to low-cost rail and a ready source of empty containers returned to the inland rail yard, inland terminals serve as magnets for industry, offering important opportunities for economic development.

“There is already excitement in the marketplace over the potential benefits of our inland terminal in Chatsworth,” said John Trent, senior director of strategic operations and safety at the Georgia Ports Authority. “We’re hearing from exporters and distribution project developers who would like to tap into the efficiencies of the ARP, and who we expect to bring jobs to the region.”

The decision to install eRTGs in Chatsworth continues a transition begun at the Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal. GPA’s initial eRTG project was the first installation of its kind at a port in North America.

The cranes are powered by 480-volt electrical connections and have the capacity to regenerate power back to the electric grid by capturing energy when lowering boxes. The eRTGs were developed through collaboration between GPA engineers and the Finnish company Konecranes. The power system was designed by Conductix-Wampfler.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GEORGIA’S PORTS SET NEW INDUSTRY STANDARD

Georgia’s ports set new industry standard

TOTAL TONNAGE CLIMBS BY 13 PERCENT

Monday, May 22, 2017

 
 
 

During the 30 hours the COSCO Development was in dock at the Port of Savannah, six cranes moved more than 9,700 TEUs on and off the vessel, with a net berth productivity of 220 boxes per hour. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 

Savannah, Ga. – May 22, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority handled 333,006 twenty-foot equivalent container units (TEUs) in April, an increase of 11.7 percent, or 34,966 TEUs, compared to the same month a year ago. Across all ports, GPA’s total tonnage increased by 13 percent, or 334,950 tons, to reach 2.94 million tons and the Authority’s busiest April ever. 

“Savannah has established itself as a premier gateway serving the Eastern United States,” said Griff Lynch, GPA’s executive director. “Our team is not only keeping pace with record volumes, but has managed to set new industry standards in cargo velocity, berth productivity and congestion free gates.” 

Lynch cited the recent visit of the COSCO Development, the first 13,000-TEU vessel to call the U.S. East Coast, as an example. During the 30 hours the vessel was in dock, six cranes moved more than 9,700 TEUs on and off the vessel, with a net berth productivity of 220 boxes per hour. 

Last month’s performance continues a surge of growth for the GPA across the first four months of the calendar year, with TEUs increasing to 1.3 million, up 10.2 percent (121,258 TEUs) compared to the same period in 2016.

“Our goal at Georgia’s ports has been to stay one step ahead of demand in the marketplace,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “As a result of this approach, we can accommodate more and more vessels like the COSCO Development without delays.”

Lynch said the scale and scope of Garden City Terminal is perfectly suited for the massive exchanges coming on and off Neo-Panamax vessels. “As the size of vessels grows, so does the need for larger terminals with significant assets to handle increased volumes. At 1,200 acres, handling nearly 10,000 truck moves per day and 38 trains per week, Savannah is perfectly positioned to fill this need,” Lynch said.

Measured in containers, total refrigerated cargo – a sector that includes export poultry, peanuts, pecans and blueberries among other farm produce – grew by 8.2 percent in April. For the calendar year to date, refrigerated cargo is up by 11.6 percent, 2,466 additional containers through April, for a total of 23,661 containers. 

Auto and machinery units via Savannah and Brunswick were up 3.5 percent (7,406) to reach 217,729 units during the first four months of the year. 

In other business, the GPA Board on Monday approved the purchase of three new electric rubber-tired gantry cranes for use at the Appalachian Regional Port (ARP) in Chatsworth, Ga. The e-RTGs virtually eliminate diesel usage, run quieter and require less maintenance than diesel-powered RTGs. The ARP, an inland port to be operated by the GPA, will open additional markets across Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky while converting tens of thousands of containers from truck to rail. The ARP is projected to begin operation in 2018. 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GPA MARKS DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH IN TOTAL CARGO

GPA marks double-digit growth in total cargo

 

CONTAINER TONS SURGE MORE THAN 14 PERCENT 

In February, the Port of Savannah moved 330,539 twenty-foot equivalent container units. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 
Savannah, Ga. – March 20, 2017 –The Georgia Ports Authority saw its busiest February ever for total cargo, moving 2.94 million tons across all docks last month – a 10 percent increase over February 2016, and second only to January’s 3.01 million tons.

Container tonnage was a leading factor in the growth, expanding by 14.4 percent (314,832 tons) to more than 2.5 million tons for the month. Measured in twenty-foot equivalent units, containerized trade grew by 7.7 percent to reach 330,539 TEUs.

“Ocean carriers have recognized the Port of Savannah as the must-call port to serve the Southeastern U.S.,” GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch reported to the Authority Board Monday. “With the coming realignment of the shipping alliances in April, Savannah will offer more container services than any other East Coast or Gulf port, at 35 weekly vessel calls.”

Lynch said Savannah’s Ocean Terminal also achieved significant growth in February, with a 9.2 percent increase in breakbulk cargo for the month, led by linerboard, iron and steel, and autos.

“A 38 percent increase in iron and steel is a good leading indicator of future growth in construction, as well as automobile and other manufacturing,” he said.

Additionally, the ports chief noted that this week Garden City Terminal in Savannah will commission a new Neo-Panamax ship-to-shore crane, with three more set to come online by mid-April. A separate, $45.3 million order will bring four more cranes to the terminal in 2018, for a total of 30.

These cranes are necessary to serve the larger vessels calling on Savannah. In the six months prior to the late June 2016 opening of the expanded Panama Canal, Garden City Terminal had hosted no vessels with a capacity of 10,000 or more TEUs. From July through December 2016, the Port of Savannah received 31 calls from 10,000+ TEU vessels – matched only by Norfolk and New York-New Jersey on the U.S. East Coast.

“As our business expands, we are investing in the infrastructure that supports that growth so that we can continue to fulfill our mission of supporting American exports and bringing new industry to Georgia,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood.

In other business, the GPA Board approved a power grid upgrade to provide greater resiliency and capacity for electric-powered equipment at Garden City Terminal. Chief Operating Officer Ed McCarthy said the Port of Savannah’s continuing shift away from diesel saves the authority millions of dollars annually in energy costs and avoids tons of diesel emissions.

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

PORT PLAN TO REDUCE GARDEN CITY TRAIN CROSSINGS

Savannah, Ga. – March 1, 2017 – At a public meeting Tuesday, representatives from Garden City, Chatham County and the Georgia Ports Authority discussed a proposal that would greatly reduce the use of rail crossings around Garden City Terminal, while increasing capacity and jobs for the local community.

The meeting focused on installation of an overpass at State Route 25. The road improvement will take vehicular traffic over planned new rail lines and Pipemakers Canal. It is proposed in conjunction with an on-terminal project that will double GPA’s rail capacity to 1 million containers per year. The new port infrastructure will remove the need to stop trains off terminal to switch rail cars, an activity which has impacted traffic on commuter routes.

 “While this project is important to the port’s business, it will greatly improve the safety and flow of traffic on major thoroughfares like Highway 21 and Main Street in Garden City,” said Mayor Don Bethune. “Moving rail switching onto Garden City Terminal will drastically reduce rail-related traffic delays for commuters and local residents.”

The changes are part of a rail expansion that will enable the GPA to better accommodate 10,000-foot long unit trains and double rail capacity without increasing truck traffic.

“Not only will this new infrastructure reduce the impact of rail cargo movements in our community, it will also help us to alleviate future truck traffic as more of our containers move by rail,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Our area will also see economic benefits, as additional intermodal capacity will create new employment opportunities on terminal and throughout the local logistics and supply chain.”

The project, dubbed the Savannah International Multi-Modal Connector, will build density into the system, and enable rail providers CSX and Norfolk Southern to deliver faster, more frequent rail service to markets ranging from Memphis to Chicago and the Ohio Valley.

Currently, 19 percent of containerized cargo moves by rail at the Port of Savannah. The expansion is geared in part toward increasing the share of cargo that moves by rail at Garden City Terminal.

The development will be partially funded by a $44 million federal Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) grant, with the remaining $84 million covered by the GPA, Genesee & Wyoming Railroad, and Chatham County. The projected completion date is in 2021.

“Expanding rail capacity and service for our customers enhances our ability to support global competitiveness for American businesses, while also improving quality of life for our neighbors in Garden City,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “The project is truly a win-win situation for commerce and the community.”

 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

PORT AUTHORITIES OF GEORGIA AND VIRGINIA FILE EAST COAST GATEWAY TERMINAL AGREEMENT

 

Port Authorities of Georgia and Virginia File East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement 
 
 

JOINT NEWS RELEASE


Georgia Ports Authority
Contact: Robert Morris
Senior Director of Corporate Communications
(912) 964-3855 / Office
(912) 657-4220 / Cell
rmorris@gaports.com

 

The Port of Virginia
Contact: Joseph Harris
Senior Director, Media Relations & Spokesperson
(757) 683-2137 / Office
(757) 675-8087/ Cell
jharris@portofvirginia.com

     

Port Authorities of Georgia and Virginia
File East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement

SAVANNAH, GA and NORFOLK, VA – The Georgia Ports Authority and the Virginia Port Authority filed on Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, with the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) to create the “East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement.”

The agreement encourages voluntary cooperation in the areas of operational and supply chain efficiencies, safety, communications and customer service.

“The U.S. East Coast continues to see larger vessels and cargo exchanges since the opening of the expanded Panama Canal last year,” VPA CEO and Executive Director John Reinhart and GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch said in a joint statement. “Increasingly, our customers are seeking gateway ports on the East Coast that can leverage sufficient landside infrastructure to ensure the free flow of cargo. The states of Georgia and Virginia have made the necessary investments to prepare for this new era in global trade. The East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement is an innovative collaboration that will allow us to find new ways to become more efficient and effective.”

The agreement will enable the member ports to work together to find ways to become more efficient and effective, which will benefit the citizens of their respective states, as well as shippers and the carriers.

Additional areas of cooperation between the GPA and VPA include acquisition and utilization of joint marketing materials and sharing best practices in areas such as terminal operating systems, training, cargo handling, access, turn-times and infrastructure, as well as supporting the promotion of all-water routes from the U.S. East Coast to the international marketplace via the Panama Canal.

Georgia and Virginia are not the first terminal operators to file with the FMC to share information. In December 2016, APM Terminals, DP World, Hutchinson Port Holdings, PSA International, Shanghai International Port (Group) Co., and the Port of Rotterdam Authority filed the “Global Ports Group Agreement” with the Federal Maritime Commission to promote the efficiency and effectiveness of the container port industry. 

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Find print-quality portraits of Griff Lynch and John Reinhart here

About Georgia Ports Authority
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

About The Port of Virginia
The Virginia Port Authority (VPA) is a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The VPA owns and through its private operating subsidiary, Virginia International Terminals, LLC (VIT), operates four general cargo facilities Norfolk International Terminals, Portsmouth Marine Terminal, Newport News Marine Terminal and the Virginia Inland Port in Warren County. The VPA leases Virginia International Gateway and Richmond Marine Terminal. In fiscal year 2013, The Port of Virginia provided more than 374,000 jobs and generated $60.3 billion in total economic impact throughout the Commonwealth.

GEORGIA PORTS MARK BUSIEST MONTH EVER

Georgia Ports mark busiest month ever

SET TONNAGE, CONTAINER RECORDS IN JANUARY

 
 The Ports of Savannah and Brunswick achieved a 26 percent increase in total tonnage in January, compared to the same month last year. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 Savannah, Ga. – February 23, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority achieved outstanding January results, with double-digit growth across all business sectors and a 26 percent increase in total tonnage. 

“The Port of Savannah is unrivaled in its connectivity into the heartland of the U.S. and the service excellence that port customers enjoy,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “With on-terminal efficiencies bolstered by interstates within minutes of the port and the fastest westward rail transit in the South Atlantic region, Garden City Terminal provides more reliable, more cost effective freight movement.” 

Lynch credited those supply chain efficiencies for the record 3 million tons of cargo GPA moved in January, up 623,504 tons compared to the same month a year ago. 

Containerized trade saw strong growth, with 331,468 twenty-foot equivalent units crossing the docks at the Port of Savannah, up 16.2 percent, or 46,167 TEUs. Of that trade, loaded containers accounted for approximately 268,000 TEUs, also a record. 

The increase in loaded containers contributed to an improvement in container tonnage of 22.1 percent (465,710 tons), for a total of 2.57 million tons for the month. 

At the Port of Brunswick, bulk cargo more than doubled to 235,802 tons in January, an increase of 125,998 tons. Meanwhile, breakbulk cargo handled at Ocean Terminal in Savannah and at the Mayor’s Point and Colonel’s Island terminals in Brunswick grew by 17.7 percent to 211,575 tons, an increase of 31,796 tons. 

Roll-on/Roll-off trade improved by 7 percent, with 52,778 units of cars, trucks and tractors moving across GPA docks in January, an increase of 3,389 vehicles compared to last year. 

“The phenomenal growth at Georgia’s ports speaks to the powerful, vibrant economy of Georgia and the Southeastern U.S.,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “As we continue to expand our transportation infrastructure through a deeper harbor, the largest crane fleet of any U.S. terminal, unmatched interstate connections and a mega-terminal for rail, you will see our ports continue to capture market share and bring new business to the state.” 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GPA ACHIEVES RECORD, DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH IN DECEMBER

GPA achieves record, double-digit growth in December

GPA ACHIEVES RECORD, DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH IN DECEMBER

INLAND TERMINAL BREAKS GROUND

Monday, January 23, 2017/Categories: Ro/Ro Cargo, Container Cargo, Economic Impact, Logistics, Port of Savannah, Port of Brunswick, Site Selection, Press Release

 

December capped a busy year in containerized trade for the Georgia Ports Authority. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 

Savannah, Ga. – Jan. 23, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority marked 12.3 percent container volume growth in December, moving 292,172 twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 32,099 TEUs compared to December 2015, a record for the GPA.

Roll-on/Roll-off cargo mirrored that growth, with a 12.3 percent increase (7,000 units) in passenger vehicles and heavy equipment handled at Colonel’s Island terminal in Brunswick and Ocean Terminal in Savannah. Georgia’s deepwater ports moved 63,967 Ro/Ro units last month.

Executive Director Griff Lynch reported at the Authority board meeting Monday that several factors led to GPA’s December record growth. “Strategic proximity to major population and manufacturing sites, direct interstate access and the most ocean carrier routes in the U.S. Southeast are the competitive advantages drawing customers to our ports,” Lynch said. “As the largest single-terminal operation in the nation, Savannah’s advantages are unmatched in the industry.”

In its effort to stay ahead of demand and accommodate future needs, the GPA broke ground last month on its new inland terminal in Northwest Georgia – the Appalachian Regional Port. Port officials estimate the CSX rail route will reduce Atlanta truck traffic by 50,000 moves annually, and expand GPA’s target market in Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky. Each container moved by rail from the inland terminal will offset 355 truck miles on Georgia highways.

“GPA’s track record of operational excellence over the past decade more than prepares it to achieve great things at the Appalachian Regional Port,” said Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “This is the next step in our transition, moving additional cargo to rail, allowing more capacity on our interstates, and extending GPA’s competitive benefits farther into the American heartland.”

Inland terminal construction is expected to take just under two years, with the start of operations at the ARP targeted for the third quarter of calendar year 2018.

Allgood said the new inland terminal will make goods manufactured within its service region — such as flooring, automobiles and tires — more competitive in the global market, while reducing carbon emissions. The ARP’s savings potential has already resulted in companies locating and expanding in Northwest Georgia to take advantage of the inland terminal’s future benefits.

Allgood began the first GPA Board Meeting of 2017 with a moment of silence for Tom J. Mahoney, Jr. who passed away January 20. Mahoney had served as assistant attorney general for the GPA from 1987 until the time of his death. “For nearly three decades, Tom Mahoney helped steer GPA’s growth and success with his wise counsel, knowledge of maritime issues and love of our ports. He will be missed.”  

In other business:

  • The GPA Board approved the purchase of new software to run gate, vessel and rail operations. The system currently in use at GPA has been retired by Navis and replaced by its N4 software. “The new software will have similar functionality, but better engineering and integration,” said Bill Sutton, GPA director of information technology. “Navis’ N4 software now has a successful track record of use in ports across North America.” The software system will be phased in at GPA terminals over an 18-month period.
  • The GPA marked its busiest year ever in loaded container traffic in 2016, moving 2.94 million twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 71,083 TEUs over 2015. Total cargo across all terminals reached 31.22 million tons in the year just ended. Counting loaded and empty containers, the Port of Savannah moved 3.64 million TEUs in calendar year 2016. 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015. 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.