GPA names Batista vice president of sales

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FOCUSED ON END-TO-END LOGISTICS SOLUTIONS

The Georgia Ports Authority has named Flavio Batista as its new vice president of sales and marketing.

“We’re delighted to add Flavio to our team,” said Cliff Pyron, chief commercial officer at GPA. “His depth of knowledge and the energy he brings to this new position will continue and strengthen the customer-centered focus that has been a hallmark of Georgia Ports.”

Batista comes to GPA from the Wallenius Wilhelmsen Group, an ocean carrier focused on developing sustainable shipping and logistics solutions for manufacturers of cars, trucks, heavy equipment and specialized cargo.

In his new position, he will direct international marketing, business development, and the sales effort toward beneficial cargo owners. Batista said his experience finding end-to-end solutions for customers will inform his work promoting Georgia Ports.

“It’s not a matter of just getting the customer to bring their cargo to the port, as opposed to somewhere else,” Batista said. “It’s about adding value to our customers beyond the port, finding the best overall solution for them.”

Batista’s experience at Wallenius Wilhelmsen spans the globe. He most recently served as senior vice president and head of Americas sales, leading ocean and logistics commercial development and customer relations in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Latin America. Prior to that position, he was executive vice president and head of commercial activities for Europe, Africa and the Middle East at Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, based in Antwerp, Belgium. Prior to his time at WWL Europe, he was vice president for WWL in Sao Paulo, Brazil, responsible for South America.

Batista acknowledged that he is transitioning from the ocean carrier business to port administration at a challenging time when container demand is easing.

“More than ever, it is important for us to be able to highlight the benefits of using Georgia Ports,” Batista said. “During the height of demand, many new customers began using the Port of Savannah, because other ports couldn’t handle their volumes. Our work now is to transition this new business into long-term, loyal customers, and recruit new companies to move their cargo through our terminals.”

Batista said he and his wife and son are excited about moving from their current home in New Jersey to Georgia’s warmer climate and Southern hospitality.

GPA handles nearly 6 million TEUs in 2022

 

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According to the latest study by the Selig Center for Economic Growth at UGA’s Terry College of Business, Georgia ports now account for 11 percent of total state employment. The number of Georgia jobs that rely on port activity has grown by 13 percent since the previous study. (Hunter McRae / Georgia Ports Authority)

UGA STUDY: GEORGIA PORTS SUPPORT MORE THAN 560,000 JOBS

SAVANNAH, Ga., Sept. 6, 2022 – Port activity in Georgia now supports 561,000 full- and part-time jobs across the Peach State, according to an economic impact study by the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. That number is up from 496,700 jobs during Fiscal Year 2019, the period covered by the last study.

“Our deepwater ports in Savannah and Brunswick are powerfully fulfilling their commission to drive economic development across the state of Georgia,” said Gov. Brian Kemp. “Beyond our marine terminals, the Georgia Ports Authority supports global commerce in farming, forestry, manufacturing and retail, benefiting every one of our counties. GPA’s global logistics network is a big reason Georgia is ranked the best state to grow or expand a business.”

According to the latest study, Georgia ports now account for 11 percent of total state employment, or one out of 9 jobs, based on FY2021 numbers.

“The superb performance of Georgia’s ports relative to other ports reflects strong comparative advantages that allowed them to expand their shares of regional and national waterborne cargo traffic,” said Jeff Humphreys, director of the Selig Center for Economic Growth, who conducted the study. “These comparative advantages are the result of a series of strategic expansions over many years.”

Humphreys said other statewide impacts include:

  • $140 billion in sales (12 percent of Georgia’s total sales);
  • $59 billion in state GDP (9 percent of Georgia’s total GDP);
  • $33 billion in income (6 percent of Georgia’s total personal income);

“These economic impacts demonstrate that continued emphasis on imports and exports through Georgia’s deepwater ports translates into jobs, higher incomes, greater production of goods and services, and revenue collections for government,” Humphreys reported. “Port operations help to preserve Georgia’s manufacturing base, and foster growth of the state’s massive logistics, distribution and warehousing cluster.”

Internal GPA data show the top three export commodity groups for the study period were food, forest products and automotive cargo. The top imports were retail goods, furniture and machinery.

“At GPA, our constant focus on improving service and infrastructure means businesses that choose Georgia are assured of our ability to grow along with them,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Our central purpose is to empower entrepreneurs and strengthen industries by providing the most efficient connections to global commerce.”

Trade through Georgia’s ports also helps to support government services, yielding $7.4 billion in federal taxes, $2 billion in state taxes, and $1.8 billion in local taxes annually.

“Our thriving ports are vital links in the national supply chain, serving tens of thousands of businesses headquartered across the state and nation,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “For Georgia, in particular, they serve as powerful recruitment tools attracting industrial development and good-paying jobs for Georgians.”

The UGA study, “The Economic Impact of Georgia’s Deepwater Ports on Georgia’s Economy in FY 2021” is the latest in a series of similar studies conducted by the Selig Center for Economic Growth. The comprehensive technical report may be viewed here.

Georgia’s deep-water

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BIG SHIP BERTH, TERMINAL IMPROVEMENTS IN THE WORKS

 

SAVANNAH, Ga., Jan. 17, 2023 – The Georgia Ports Authority handled a record 5.9 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in Calendar Year 2022, an increase of 5 percent over 2021.

“It was a challenging year, but collaborative effort across Georgia’s supply chain ensured cargo movement remained fluid,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “I want to thank our Board for approving new infrastructure that allowed us to handle more cargo. Our gratitude also goes out to GPA employees and our partners at Gateway International, the International Longshoremen’s Association, trucking and rail. Their long hours and dedication were key to our success.”

The Port of Savannah achieved four of its top five months for container volume in CY2022, with trade volumes peaking in August at an all-time high of 575,500 TEUs.

“We’re excited about the possibilities ahead, with major infrastructure projects delivering greater capacity and efficiency for our customers,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “At Georgia Ports, we’re bringing to market faster vessel service, quicker turn times for trucks and more room to grow business.”

With the renovation of Berth 1 at Garden City Terminal to handle 16,000+ TEU vessels, the 90-acre Garden City Terminal West expansion and the transition of Ocean Terminal to an all-container facility, the Port of Savannah is set to increase annual capacity from 6 million to 7.5 million TEUs in 2023, and to 9 million by 2025. Learn more about GPA’s growth plans here.

In addition to record container cargo in 2022, GPA achieved a 16 percent increase in breakbulk tonnage to nearly 3.3 million tons last year, an improvement of 443,000 tons compared to 2021. In Roll-on/Roll-off cargo, Colonel’s Island Terminal in Brunswick handled 651,101 units of autos and heavy machinery. Ocean Terminal in Savannah moved another 19,630 Ro/Ro units, for a total of 670,731, an increase of 0.4 percent.

Total tonnage crossing all GPA docks reached 42.4 million tons last year, an increase of about 2 percent or nearly 760,000 tons.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,000 jobs throughout the state annually, and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,087 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

SAVANNAH CUTS VESSEL BACKLOG

SAVANNAH, Ga., Dec. 13, 2022 – The Georgia Ports Authority moved 464,883 twenty-foot equivalent container units in November, a decrease of 6.2 percent or 30,866 TEUs compared to the same month last year.

Compared to November 2019, the Port of Savannah’s performance constitutes an increase of 28 percent over three years. That rate of growth is well above GPA’s pre-pandemic expansion, which averaged 4 to 5 percent annually.

“Container trade at U.S. ports is returning to a more sustainable growth pattern, which is a positive development for the logistics industry” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Along with the addition of more than 1 million TEUs of annual capacity, a slight reduction in demand will mean faster vessel service as we work to bring a new big ship berth online at Garden City Terminal in July.”

The impact of inflation and a shift in consumer spending are partially responsible for a reduction in manufacturing and subsequent container demand. Weather also played a role in the November decline. The Savannah River channel was closed to the largest vessels for more than three days last month because of adverse weather conditions, including Tropical Storm Nicole.

“While we are planning for a moderation in the container trade, we expect volumes to remain strong, though shy of the historic highs of the past year,” said GPA Chairman Joel Wooten. “Announcements from automakers and other manufacturers coming to Georgia, as well as an array of their suppliers, will mean healthy increases in trade over the long term.”

Lynch said the current lull has allowed Savannah to reduce its vessel queue to 17 container ships, down 43 percent from Nov. 1, when there were 30 vessels at anchor. GPA expects to clear the backlog by early January.

The Authority announced last week its intention to renovate the docks at Ocean Terminal in Savannah to provide two additional big ship berths, and transform the 200-acre facility to a container-only operation by 2026.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,000 jobs throughout the state annually, and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

Port of Savannah outperforming national container market

The Georgia Ports Authority has moved more than half a million twenty-foot equivalent container units in three of the last four months. Since July, 160 importers were either new customers at the Port of Savannah or existing customers who grew their Savannah trade by 20 percent or more. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen Morton)

 

OCTOBER AUTO TRADE GROWS 46 PERCENT IN BRUNSWICK 

SAVANNAH, Ga., Nov. 14, 2022 – The Georgia Ports Authority handled 552,800 twenty-foot equivalent container units in October, for an increase of 9.6 percent (48,460 TEUs) compared to the same month last year.

“Customers continue to bring new or expanding business to the Port of Savannah, drawn by our global connectivity and the supply chain network that links Savannah to major U.S. markets,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “We can report that ships at anchor are trending downward and expanded berth capacity coming online next year will allow us to serve our growing customer base with even greater efficiency.”

Lynch thanked GPA employees, as well as the port’s partners across the logistics community for their efforts in handling the business.

Port of Savannah

October was GPA’s second busiest month on record after only August of this year, when the Port of Savannah handled 575,500 TEUs. GPA has now topped half a million TEUs in three of the first four months of Fiscal Year 2023, for total volumes of 2.1 million TEUs for the year to date.

In the opening months of the current fiscal year, 160 importers were either new customers at the Port of Savannah or existing customers who grew their Savannah trade by 20 percent or more. This combined increase represented 107,000 additional TEUs from July through October compared to the previous year.

“There has been downward pressure on the total U.S. container trade related to inflation and a shift in consumer spending toward services such as restaurants and travel,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “However, the Port of Savannah continues to outperform relative to the national market, driving new business for Georgia.”

Additionally, Savannah and other East and Gulf Coast ports have been gaining market share relative to the West Coast. According to the most recent data from PIERS/IHS Markit, the East Coast increased its share of the container trade from 47 percent in July 2021 to 48.4 percent in July of this year.

Port of Brunswick

The Port of Brunswick also achieved significant growth in October. Colonel’s Island Terminal handled 70,233 units of Roll-on/Roll-off cargo last month, an increase of 22,045 units or nearly 46 percent.

“Greater availability of computer chips has allowed carmakers to increase production,” said GPA Chief Commercial Officer Cliff Pyron. “This, combined with manufacturers’ traditional end-of-year push, yielded strong results for our October auto volumes.”

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,000 jobs throughout the state annually, and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

GPA EXPECTS GROWTH TO MODERATE IN COMING MONTHS

The Port of Savannah grew container volumes by nearly 10 percent in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2023. A shift in consumer spending and inflation pressures are expected to moderate demand for port services in the coming months. (Georgia Ports Authority)
The Port of Savannah grew container volumes by nearly 10 percent in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2023. A shift in consumer spending and inflation pressures are expected to moderate demand for port services in the coming months. (Georgia Ports Authority)

 

SAVANNAH, Ga., October 13, 2022 – The Georgia Ports Authority handled more than 1.5 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2023 (July-September), an increase of 135,000 TEUs, or 9.6 percent over the same period last year.

 

“A high number of ad hoc vessel calls, the addition of three new Mediterranean services, and one new service to Asia contributed to the growth,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Additionally, our regular services have been arriving with significantly more cargo destined for Savannah.”

 

Lynch said the average vessel exchange grew from 3,500 TEUs per ship this time last year, to 4,500 TEUs across the past three months. The Port of Savannah handled 776,067 TEUs of loaded and empty exports in the first quarter, while import trade totaled 766,525 TEUs. Loaded containers represented 70 percent of the total container trade.

 

In intermodal rail, GPA grew lifts 6.4 percent in the first quarter. Counting all rail cargo moved through Garden City Terminal, the Appalachian Regional Port and GPA’s pop-up container yards, rail lifts totaled nearly 146,000 for the three-month period, an increase of 8,775.

 

“While we have seen powerful growth across the first quarter, we are beginning to see signs of correction in the market,” Lynch said, noting that September container volumes were off by 7.6 percent compared to the same month last year, at 436,279 TEUs. A nearly three-day suspension of vessel service related to Hurricane Ian impacted September volumes at the Port of Savannah.

 

GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten said the Authority’s outlook for the rest of the calendar year is strong, but moderated compared to the rate of growth experienced over the past two years

 

“We’re expecting a gradual easing in demand based on several factors, including a shift in the balance of consumer spending away from goods and back to services, and the impact of inflation on the economy,” Wooten said. “After having increased trade at a compound annual growth rate of 14 percent over the past two fiscal years, this change will represent a return to a more typical rate of growth for GPA.”

 

An easing of demand should help U.S. ports address vessel backlogs brought on by unprecedented import volumes, Lynch said. The Port of Savannah expects to clear the need for vessels to wait at anchor by the end of November. Presently, approximately 204,600 containers are on the water headed for Savannah, down from a high of 262,500 in July.

 

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,000 jobs throughout the state annually, and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

Georgia Ports welcomes Nissan to Brunswick

WWL-at-Colonels-Island-scaled
The Port of Brunswick handled 53,600 units of vehicles and heavy machinery in August, an increase of 1,700 compared to the same month last year. The auto port recently added Nissan to its list of customers. (Georgia Ports Authority)

Carmaker cites proximity to markets as key benefit

SAVANNAH, Ga., September 27, 2022 – Nissan North America has chosen the Port of Brunswick, Ga., as a new point of entry to serve U.S. markets.

“We are pleased that Nissan has chosen the Peach State as its gateway to the Southeast,” said Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority. “Brunswick’s central location and superior connectivity, combined with the ease of doing business in Georgia, make it the perfect home for Nissan to serve the fastest growing region in the U.S.”

Nissan North America joins two dozen other major auto manufacturers at Colonel’s Island. The 1,700-acre terminal provides immediate access to Interstate 95, and from there, I-10 and I-16.

“Brunswick is a great fit into Nissan’s network, based on its location close to our dealerships in the southeastern U.S., proximity to I-95 for truck haul-away, and rail connections,” said J.S. Bolton, director of supply chain management for Nissan. 

At the GPA Board meeting Tuesday, Lynch reported that August Roll-on/Roll-off volumes at the Port of Brunswick grew 3.3 percent to 53,600 units, an increase of 1,700 units of vehicles and heavy machinery compared to August 2021.

“For manufacturers seeking to serve areas such as Atlanta, Birmingham, Nashville, Charlotte or markets across Florida, the auto port at Colonel’s Island offers the best mix of inland connectivity and a broad ocean carrier network,” said Cliff Pyron, chief commercial officer at GPA. “Its position as the nation’s second busiest, but fastest growing Ro/Ro port offers a strong customer endorsement for relying on Georgia Ports.”

To help accommodate new business, GPA has developed an additional 85 acres for storage. Further, Wallenius Wilhelmsen Solutions is building three new buildings to support its auto processing operation for Nissan and Infiniti. The buildings are expected to be complete this fall.

Also at its meeting Tuesday, the GPA Board approved $60 million for additional buildings, property development and civil infrastructure to expand Ro/Ro capacity at Colonel’s Island Terminal. The new slate of projects is in addition to $186.8 million in improvements the board approved in January and March. A total of $25.4 million will go to upgrades for GPA common areas.

“With WWS expanding its presence to make Brunswick a hub port for its auto processing, combined with new customers such as Nissan coming onboard, Colonel’s Island Terminal is poised to become the nation’s premier gateway for vehicles and heavy machinery,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “With the enormous asset of space, our facility provides ample room to take on new business with on-site auto processing for services such as accessory installation.”

The Port of Brunswick recently received federal approval to add a fourth berth at Colonel’s Island. The project will more efficiently accommodate the larger vessels with a capacity of 7,000-plus vehicles that are becoming the industry standard at U.S. ports.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 561,000 jobs throughout the state annually, and contribute $33 billion in income, $140 billion in revenue and $3.8 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

GPA off to accelerated start in new fiscal year

Crews work to prepare Berth 1 at Garden City Terminal to serve vessels with a capacity of 16,000+ twenty-foot equivalent container units. The Georgia Ports Authority is building new berth and container yard capacity to accommodate growing demand.

 

UNPRECEDENTED VOLUME MOVES THROUGH PORT OF SAVANNAH

SAVANNAH, Ga., Aug. 8, 2022 – The Georgia Ports Authority kicked off its new fiscal year with the fastest start ever, handling 530,800 twenty-foot equivalent container units in July, an increase of 18 percent.

Since January, GPA has moved 3.4 million TEUs, up 231,400 or 7 percent over its performance during the same period in 2021 – a record year in which GPA handled 5.6 million TEUs. Annualized, the July volumes have the Port of Savannah moving containers at a rate of more than 6 million TEUs per year.

“The Port of Savannah has clearly become a preferred East Coast gateway for shippers globally, including cargo diverted from the U.S. West Coast,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Our expedited infrastructure projects, extended gate hours and the outstanding work of our employees and partners are key to our ability to move cargo at a record pace.”

To better suit drivers’ needs, GPA has shifted operations to start two hours earlier, with gates now open from 4 a.m. to 9 p.m. without interruption. Since the new hours were implemented on Aug. 1, the port has seen strong adoption from drivers, with 3,000 transactions completed in the 4 a.m. to 6 a.m. time block over the past week.

Lynch commended Gateway Terminals and local members of the International Longshoremen Association, including the clerks and checkers as well as maintenance and repair workers, for keeping the truck gates fluid, and the containers and chassis in working order. The Port of Savannah’s gate operations averaged 15,000 truck moves per weekday in July, including both import and export transactions.

“Our partnership with GPA allows us to optimize efficiency for a continuous flow of containers to foreign markets and to the factories, distribution centers and retail outlets that serve our nation’s economy,” said Kevin Price, president of Gateway Terminals. “The tremendous demand for services from Georgia Ports is a testament to the customer-centered drive that is at the heart of all our efforts.”

Lynch noted that Savannah’s container operation is growing to deftly accommodate the increasing needs of existing and future customers. Current infrastructure projects will soon increase berth capacity to handle vessels faster. GPA has eight new ship-to-shore cranes on order, with the first four arriving in February and the next four arriving by the end of 2023. Additionally, another big ship berth at Garden City Terminal is 60 percent complete, with the improvements slated to come online in July 2023. The improved berth will add 1.4 million TEUs of berth capacity, while the Garden City Terminal West project will add another 1 million TEUs of container yard capacity in phases during 2023 and 2024.

Georgia Ports Authority will grow annual berth capacity from 6 million to 7.5 million TEUs by next year, and 9 million TEUs by 2025. GPA anticipates spending $4.5 billion over the next 12 years to expand its container-handling capabilities.

“While the global logistics network has been challenged over the past two years, our message to customers is that at GPA, we’re continuing to build and expand,” said GPA Chairman Joel Wooten. “We’re moving forward with an aggressive plan to enhance our terminal operations and improve the rail connectivity to major commercial and manufacturing centers.”

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

Savannah stays on pace at nearly 5.8M TEUs in FY2022

 

The Georgia Ports Authority closed out Fiscal Year 2022 with its busiest June ever, handling 494,107 twenty-foot equivalent container units. GPA is handling the highest volume of ad hoc and new service vessels the Port of Savannah has experienced to date.

 

GPA KEEPS CONTAINERS FLOWING AMID UNPRECEDENTED VOLUMES

SAVANNAH, Ga., July 26, 2022 – Fiscal Year 2022 was another record-breaker for the Georgia Ports Authority, with container volumes growing 8 percent for a total of 5.76 million twenty-foot equivalent container units.

The Port of Savannah ended the year with a record June, handling 494,107 TEUs in total cargo, up 10.6 percent or 47,300 TEUs compared to the same month last year.

“As the hub in a global network of road, rail and ocean carrier connections, our ports link Georgia businesses to international trade lanes and open doors to prosperity for our state and nation,” said Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. “The Georgia Ports Authority and its partners in the logistics industry are powerful drivers for local economies across the Peach State, from small communities to our thriving urban centers.”

In addition to organic growth among its port customers, Savannah trade has also been boosted by West Coast labor talks and delayed access to rail at West Coast ports, prompting a significant shift in vessel calls. Savannah is also receiving container trade diverted from the Port of Charleston. GPA is currently handling the highest volume of ad hoc and new service vessels the Port of Savannah has experienced to date. Uncertainty around the labor talks, unprecedented and unplanned vessel calls, record cargo volume, and vessel diversions to Savannah have contributed to a higher than normal number of vessels waiting at anchor.

“Despite the record volumes, the Port of Savannah remains fluid,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Several factors have contributed to our growing container capacity, including expedited infrastructure projects, our inland pop-up yards and an influx of truck drivers moving to the Southeast.”

GPA is experiencing record truck turns during both its day and night-gate operations. Garden City Terminal saw a weekday average of 14,500 truck moves in June, counting both inbound and outbound gate exchanges.

To better accommodate rising demand, the GPA recruited 166 new workers in FY2022, for a total of 1,647 direct employees.

“I would like to thank our employees, as well as our partners at Gateway Terminals and the International Longshoremen’s Association for their outstanding work to keep commerce flowing across our docks,” Lynch said. “Through communication, collaboration and teamwork, we continue to provide unmatched service to our mutual customers.”

Looking forward, the GPA Board approved the purchase of 12 new rubber-tired gantry cranes and other container handling equipment at its regular July meeting. The RTG purchase totals $30.25 million. The Port of Savannah already features 198 RTGs, and another 24 were already on order. Tuesday’s action will bring the fleet to 234 in Savannah.

“Growing our workforce and infrastructure is part of the Board’s continuing commitment to keep our deepwater terminals ready to take on new trade,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “Presently, we are expanding our dock space to handle additional big ships and increasing our container storage space in Savannah, while simultaneously enhancing our capabilities to move autos and breakbulk in Brunswick.”

In FY2022, export loads accounted for 1.32 million TEUs for GPA, while import loads totaled 2.86 million. Top exports included forest products, kaolin clay and automotive cargo. Top import commodities included furniture, machinery and plastic goods.

In addition to increased container trade, breakbulk tonnage also saw strong growth in FY2022, up 15.7 percent to more than 3 million tons. Mayor’s Point Terminal in Brunswick turned in a particularly strong performance, with breakbulk forest products leaping from 52,244 tons in FY2021 to 252,000 tons in the fiscal year ended June 30.

“Much of the increase in breakbulk cargo crossing GPA docks is related to the relatively lower cost of breakbulk movement compared to container rates in today’s market,” Lynch said.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 496,700 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $29 billion in income, $122 billion in revenue and $3.4 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

GPA sets all-time trade record in May

The Port of Savannah handled more than 519,000 twenty-foot equivalent container units in May, a record. Georgia Ports Authority is expanding Berth 1 (50 percent complete) and yard capacity in Savannah to accommodate the growing container trade. Find print-quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority)

 

SAVANNAH, Ga., June 15, 2022 – The Georgia Ports Authority moved an all-time high 519,390 twenty-foot equivalent container units in May, breaking the previous record of 504,350 TEUs set in October 2021.

GPA’s May volumes grew by 8.5 percent, or 40,770 TEUs, compared to the same month last year.

“Despite global supply chain challenges, the Port of Savannah continues to be an economic driver, providing reliable, world-class service for port customers across our state and nation,” said Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. “Delivering new opportunity for hardworking Georgians and supporting economic prosperity across the Peach State is central to the mission of our deepwater ports.”

GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch noted Garden City Terminal is handling more business during the current influx of trade than during the previous spike, last fall. The additional trade is driven in part by vessels diverting to Savannah from other East and West Coast ports.

“Strong consumer demand continues to drive higher volumes at the Port of Savannah,” Lynch said. “The infrastructure improvements and pop-up yards approved by the GPA Board have enabled our operations to maintain the flow of cargo across our terminal, despite unprecedented container volumes passing through the port.”

As of April, GPA has added 900,000 TEUs of annual capacity to Garden City Terminal. Another 300,000 are expected to come online in July for a new total of more than 7 million TEUs of container handling space.

Additionally, Phase I of the Garden City Terminal West expansion has added a 25-acre container yard adjacent to Ga. Highway 21, a principal truck route approaching the main terminal. Phase II will add up to 1 million TEUs of annual capacity, which will begin coming online in 2023.

“By increasing container space at Garden City Terminal, GPA is accommodating the expansion in global commerce that supports job growth in Georgia,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten.  “Industries from logistics to auto manufacturing, and agriculture to retail depend on Georgia’s ports for reliable supply chain solutions.”

The Port of Savannah completed 327,400 truck gate moves in May, counting loaded import and export containers, as well as the movement of empty chassis. Thanks to the flexibility of motor carriers taking advantage of night gate hours, Garden City Terminal facilitated more than 15,000 truck moves between the hours of 7 and 11 p.m. last month, up from just over 10,000 in April. Another 48,000 containers (approximately 88,000 TEUs) moved by rail in May.

In addition to the container trade, GPA achieved a 28 percent increase in breakbulk cargo for the month. Breakbulk commodities including iron and steel, rubber, and forest products reached 320,722 tons in May, up 70,780 tons.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 496,700 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $29 billion in income, $122 billion in revenue and $3.4 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

Port of Savannah moves nearly 500K TEUs in record April

The Port of Savannah handled 4.75 million twenty-foot equivalent container units over the first 10 months of Fiscal Year 2022 (July-April), up 8 percent. Georgia Ports Authority is expanding berth and container yard capacity in Savannah to accommodate growing business.

GPA SET FOR MAJOR CAPACITY IMPROVEMENT

SAVANNAH, Ga., May 17, 2022 – The Port of Savannah handled 495,782 twenty-foot equivalent container units last month, a record for the month of April and the Georgia Ports Authority’s third busiest month ever. GPA’s Garden City Terminal now handles nearly one out of every nine loaded containers crossing the nation’s docks.

“The phenomenal growth we have achieved has been made possible by the team effort of GPA and Gateway Terminals employees, the International Longshoremen’s Association, and our partners in trucking and rail,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Their hard work has ensured the free flow of cargo between major markets across the U.S. Southeast and the world.”

GPA’s containerized trade increased 6.2 percent, or 29,150 TEUs in April, compared to the same month a year ago. The growth is related in part to retailers replenishing depleted inventories and making early orders to ensure product availability. For the fiscal year to date, GPA has handled 4.75 million TEUs, an improvement of 8 percent or 344,260 TEUs year over year.

“Our long-running program of infrastructure expansion, coupled with the Authority’s ability as an owner-operator to speed up the schedule of development, has allowed the Port of Savannah to adapt to heightened container volumes,” said GPA Board Chairman Joel Wooten. “On-terminal and inland capacity improvements enable cargo to flow across our docks without congestion.”

Savannah was recently ranked the top U.S. container port by loaded export volume, handling 1.38 million TEUs in Calendar Year 2021.

Board Actions

At Tuesday’s meeting, Board members voted to retain the current slate of officers, maintaining Chairman Joel Wooten, Vice Chairman Kent Fountain, and Secretary-Treasurer Alec Poitevint. The three will serve a second term in their positions in Fiscal Year 2023, running from July 1, 2022, through June 30, 2023.

Capacity Improvement Update

  • In other business Tuesday, the Board approved a measure to replace a 50,000 square-foot cargo shed at Mayor’s Point Terminal in Brunswick with a new, 100,000 square-foot warehouse with up-to-date life safety improvements and flooring upgrades to handle heavy cargoes.
  • The renovations to Container Berth 1 at Garden City Terminal are more than 40 percent complete. The realigned CB-1 will increase annual berth capacity by 1.4 million TEUs and provide an additional big ship berth served by new ship-to-shore cranes. Substantial completion is expected in June 2023.
  • In addition, the Authority expects to bring online nine new electric rubber-tired gantry cranes by the spring of 2023. This will bring the Port of Savannah’s total RTG fleet to 207.
  • The Peak Capacity Project has added 900,000 TEUs of annual container yard capacity to Garden City Terminal as of April 13. Another 300,000 TEUs of capacity are expected to come online by July.
  • Phase I of the Garden City Terminal West project will add a 25-acre chassis yard adjacent to Ga. 21. Grading and placement of aggregate base are ongoing, with the contractor having turned over approximately 10 acres of space for use in February. Construction should be complete by mid-summer.
  • Phase II of the Garden City Terminal West project will add a total of 1 million TEUs of annual capacity, with the first phase coming online in 2023.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 496,700 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $29 billion in income, $122 billion in revenue and $3.4 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Loretta Lepore at (912) 964-3855 or llepore@gaports.com.

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