Archive For The “GA Ports Authority Press Releases” Category

Port of Savannah up 17 percent in February

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Vessel operations, terminal services and Monday-Friday truck gate hours continue as normal at Georgia’s ports. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

GEORGIA TERMINALS CONTINUE TO MOVE CARGO AMID COVID-19 CRISIS

 

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 23, 2020  The Port of Savannah achieved its busiest February ever last month, handling 364,405 twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 17 percent over the same month last year.

Although March volumes are expected to dip due to the impact of COVID-19 compared to March 2019, all terminals remain open for business, with normal vessel operations, terminal services, and Monday-Friday truck gate hours.

“We are thankful for the confidence our customers continue to show in Georgia’s reliable transportation networks, amid such uncertainty in the market,” said Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority. “The strong fundamentals at the deepwater ports of Savannah and Brunswick have fueled powerful expansions in our cargo volumes and market share; they will also help us to weather the current storm related to coronavirus disruptions.”

To help GPA prepare for the future, the Port of Savannah received three additional ship-to-shore cranes this month, bringing Garden City Terminal’s total fleet to 36. In addition, other efforts include the Mason Mega Rail project, which will double Savannah’s rail capacity; and the recent acquisition of 145 acres contiguous to Garden City Terminal, which will increase the terminal’s footprint to more than 1,300 acres and add more than 1 million TEUs in annual capacity.

“The Authority’s forward thinking means our ports will be well positioned to take advantage of new opportunities when they arise,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “Savannah is poised to lead the U.S. East Coast and the nation as we recover from the present downturn.”

For the fiscal year to date, 3.1 million TEUs have crossed the docks at Garden City Terminal, up 4 percent. As the nation’s third busiest gateway for containerized trade, Savannah now handles more than one in five containers crossing U.S. East Coast docks.

In his report to the board Monday, Lynch described current efforts to keep cargo flowing during the COVID-19 crisis, that include adding new capacity for container storage, allowing some workers to telecommute, and strict observance of CDC and state of Georgia policies to prevent the spread of the virus.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or corporatecommunications@gaports.com.

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GPA adds new container storage space

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New space devoted to loaded container storage at the Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal will give customers an additional 400,000 TEUs of annual container handling capacity. (Georgia Ports Authority)

 

 

DELIVERS NEW FLEXIBILITY TO PORT CUSTOMERS

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 19, 2020 – The Port of Savannah is bringing online 400,000 TEUs of annual container capacity at just the time when many port customers are seeking new storage options.

“With slowing demand related to the coronavirus, port users need space to stage their cargo until that demand returns,” said Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch. “With these new container stack areas, Savannah is delivering the flexibility our customers need.”

GPA recently added container slots totaling nearly 5,000 TEUs of space to its operation. By mid-April, more than 6,000 TEUs of capacity will go into service, for a total of 11,130 TEUs of new container stacking space. These additions will increase Savannah’s annual capacity by 400,000 twenty-foot equivalent container units, for a new total capacity of 6 million TEUs per year.

“Our terminals continue to function with operational ease and efficiency,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “From time to time, spikes in demand occur because of new customer needs or other factors impacting the global supply chain. Through the Authority’s steady investment in capacity, GPA is able to handle unexpected surges in container yard demand, whatever the cause.”

At 1,345 acres, the Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal is the largest single-operator container terminal in North America. Its nearly 10,000 feet of contiguous dock space is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. This allows greater scheduling flexibility for the 36 container ship services that call on the Port of Savannah. Garden City Terminal also features on-terminal rail service from CSX and Norfolk Southern, three major truck gates and 50 truck lanes.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or corporatecommunications@gaports.com.

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New arrivals bring Savannah’s crane fleet to 36

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The cargo ship BigLift Barentsz sails past historic River Street to the Port of Savannah with three new Neo-Panamax ship-to-shore cranes on Tuesday, March 10, 2020. When fully assembled, the cranes will stand 295 tall, with booms reaching 22 containers across. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 

MOST CRANES OF ANY NORTH AMERICAN TERMINAL

SAVANNAH, Ga., March 11, 2020 – The Port of Savannah received three Neo-Panamax ship-to-shore cranes on Tuesday, bringing its total to 36, more than any other single terminal in North America.

“Along with dock improvements at Garden City Terminal, our growing crane fleet will allow Savannah to serve four 14,000-TEU vessels simultaneously by 2023,” said Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch. “We’re already moving containers from vessel to rail in 24 hours, and these investments will help to ensure cargo fluidity as our business grows.”

The new cranes, designed by Konecranes of Finland, will immediately undergo a commissioning process. The first new crane will go into service in approximately 12 weeks, and all three will be loading and unloading vessels by the end of June.

“The decision to invest in these cranes was made two and a half years ago to meet growing cargo demands,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “By adding new capacity on our docks, Savannah’s position as the Southeast’s cargo hub will continue to attract new customers, additional market share and new opportunities for growth.”

In December 2019, three additional cranes arrived in Savannah. Among the largest working the nation’s ports today, the new cranes tower 295 feet above the docks when fully raised and assembled.

Of the cranes that arrived in December, the first is already in use. The second crane is in its final commissioning phase and should be in use in the third week of March. The boom of the third crane was raised last week, and should be in operation by April.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017. 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or corporatecommunications@gaports.com.

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GPA unveils major expansions

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New terminals, big ship berth space in the works  
   
 
 
 
Recently, the Port of Savannah’s 30 cranes were busy working seven vessels simultaneously along Garden City Terminal’s 10,000-foot dock. At the Georgia Foreign Trade Conference Tuesday, Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch laid out a plan for expanding the port’s capacity to more than 9 million TEUs by 2030. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority/Jeremy Polston)
SEA ISLAND, Ga., Feb. 4, 2020- At the Georgia Foreign Trade Conference Tuesday, Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority, announced the acquisition of 145 contiguous acres to the Port of Savannah, or more than 1 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in annual capacity.
 
“As the Georgia Ports Authority enters its 75th year, we are proud to follow in the tradition of those who came before us, making exciting advances in capacity and technology to ensure our terminals remain at the forefront of global commerce,” Lynch said. “This is the largest addition of container terminal space in Savannah in more than 20 years, and represents a powerful opportunity for Georgia to take on new trade.”
 
During his presentation, Lynch also announced that Garden City Terminal dock construction had been completed, and can now serve three 14,000-TEU vessels, and up to eight vessels simultaneously.
 
The improved dock and additional container yard space are part of a larger blueprint to increase the GPA’s capacity to more than 9 million TEUs by 2030. By 2023, the GPA will add an additional berth, for a total of four big ship vessel slots.
 
“The expansion at our deepwater ports in both Savannah and Brunswick is helping to fuel growth, and in turn investment, jobs and increased competitiveness on the global stage,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “With the kind of investment and infrastructure development announced today, Georgia’s ports will undoubtedly stay ahead of the curve and the competition.”
 
In order to improve service, Savannah’s Ocean Terminal will be partially converted to handle containers. Renovations at Ocean Terminal, located just downriver from the main container port, will include a new truck gate, upgraded container yards and rubber-tired gantry cranes for container operations.
 
“This exciting new development will allow the GPA to continue to meet and exceed the needs of our customers,” Lynch said.
 
Construction is currently under way on the upgrades. Phase I of the Ocean Terminal container yard is expected to be completed by the end of 2020.
 
Lynch also outlined plans for the new Savannah Container Terminal, a nearly 200-acre facility to be built on Hutchinson Island. The new facility will have a capacity of 2.5 million TEUs when fully developed. Phase I is projected to come online in 2025.
 
To ensure the GPA remains on the cutting edge of port staffing and technology, Lynch announced an expansion of the Authority’s Y.E.S (Youth learning Equipment and Safety) program, in which high school graduates are hired and trained for equipment operator careers. GPA hopes to begin hiring 50 recent graduates per year to help meet staffing needs.
 
Lynch also unveiled Tuesday a new program, dubbed GET SET (Sustainability, Efficiency, Technology).
 
“The GET SET program is a competitive juried contest for college students in Georgia, in which they will be challenged to put forth innovative solutions to issues faced by the maritime logistics community,” Lynch said. “Students or student teams submitting winning entries will receive a cash prize totaling $25,000.”
 
He said the Authority will be working with universities across the state to integrate the GET SET program into their curricula over the next year, with the first prize being awarded in the summer of 2021.
 
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

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GPA unveils major expansions

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The Port of Savannah moved a record 4.6 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in Calendar Year 2019. (Georgia Ports Authority / Jeremy Polston)

NEW TERMINALS, BIG SHIP BERTH SPACE IN THE WORKS

SEA ISLAND, Ga., Feb. 4, 2020– At the Georgia Foreign Trade Conference Tuesday, Griff Lynch, executive director of the Georgia Ports Authority, announced the acquisition of 145 contiguous acres to the Port of Savannah, or more than 1 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in annual capacity.

“As the Georgia Ports Authority enters its 75th year, we are proud to follow in the tradition of those who came before us, making exciting advances in capacity and technology to ensure our terminals remain at the forefront of global commerce,”

Lynch said. “This is the largest addition of container terminal space in Savannah in more than 20 years, and represents a powerful opportunity for Georgia to take on new trade.”

During his presentation, Lynch also announced that Garden City Terminal dock construction had been completed, and can now serve three 14,000-TEU vessels, and up to eight vessels simultaneously.

The improved dock and additional container yard space are part of a larger blueprint to increase the GPA’s capacity to more than 9 million TEUs by 2030. By 2023, the GPA will add an additional berth, for a total of four big ship vessel slots.

“The expansion at our deepwater ports in both Savannah and Brunswick is helping to fuel growth, and in turn investment, jobs and increased competitiveness on the global stage,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “With the kind of investment and infrastructure development announced today, Georgia’s ports will undoubtedly stay ahead of the curve and the competition.”

In order to improve service, Savannah’s Ocean Terminal will be partially converted to handle containers. Renovations at Ocean Terminal, located just downriver from the main container port, will include a new truck gate, upgraded container yards and rubber-tired gantry cranes for container operations.

“This exciting new development will allow the GPA to continue to meet and exceed the needs of our customers,” Lynch said.

Construction is currently under way on the upgrades. Phase I of the Ocean Terminal container yard is expected to be completed by the end of 2020.

Lynch also outlined plans for the new Savannah Container Terminal, a nearly 200-acre facility to be built on Hutchinson Island. The new facility will have a capacity of 2.5 million TEUs when fully developed. Phase I is projected to come online in 2025.

To ensure the GPA remains on the cutting edge of port staffing and technology, Lynch announced an expansion of the Authority’s Y.E.S (Youth learning Equipment and Safety) program, in which high school graduates are hired and trained for equipment operator careers. GPA hopes to begin hiring 50 recent graduates per year to help meet staffing needs.

Lynch also unveiled Tuesday a new program, dubbed GET SET (Sustainability, Efficiency, Technology).

“The GET SET program is a competitive juried contest for college students in Georgia, in which they will be challenged to put forth innovative solutions to issues faced by the maritime logistics community,” Lynch said. “Students or student teams submitting winning entries will receive a cash prize totaling $25,000.”

He said the Authority will be working with universities across the state to integrate the GET SET program into their curricula over the next year, with the first prize being awarded in the summer of 2021.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855.

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Kemp kicks off Georgia Foreign Trade Conference

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp touted the deepwater ports of Savannah and Brunswick as magnets for economic development in his address Monday to the Georgia Foreign Trade Conference. The Georgia Ports Authority handled 4.6 million twenty-foot equivalent container units and 38.5 million tons of cargo in Calendar Year 2019. Find print quality photos here. (Georgia Ports Authority/Emily Goldman)

Logistics industry ‘a strong economic driver’

SEA ISLAND, Ga., Feb. 3, 2020– Gov. Brian Kemp kicked off the Georgia Foreign Trade Conference Monday, highlighting the state and nation’s continued strength in global trade.

“With low unemployment, strong consumer confidence and a new trade deal with China that has already resulted in new poultry exports, Georgia is poised to be a bright spot for the nation in the coming year,” Kemp said. “In 2020, we expect port activity, and the logistics industry in general, to remain a strong economic driver, and an important support network for farms and factories across the state.”

Prior to a 2015 Chinese ban on U.S. poultry, the market represented $500 million in annual sales for U.S. producers. According to the USA Poultry and Egg Export Council, today the market for chicken feet alone amounts to $835 million per year for U.S. companies.

“As the nation’s largest poultry producer, Georgia stands to recapture a substantial portion of the Chinese market,” Kemp said. “Forty percent of all frozen poultry that leaves the United States does so through the Port of Savannah.”

The first shipment of poultry – 50,000 pounds of Georgia-produced chicken feet – arrived in China in January. The governor added that cotton, animal feed, grain, peanuts and pecans, among other Georgia exports also stand to benefit from the Phase I trade deal with China, signed Jan. 15.

“Strong negotiations with China have paid off and present a substantial opportunity for producers in Georgia,” he said.

Farm products are not the only promising export commodity for Georgia.  Kemp recounted his April visit to the Port of Savannah to announce the decision by Plastic Express to build two 1 million square-foot facilities to handle plastic resin exports via Garden City Terminal.

“Construction is complete on the first building for Plastic Express at the Port Logistics Center in Pooler,” Kemp said. “That one company is bringing 166 new jobs and $172 million in investment to our state.”

Along with resin packager A&R Logistics’ decision to establish its global logistics center at the Savannah Gateway Industrial Hub, resins represent a promising market opportunity for Georgia.

“The outlook for growth through our deepwater terminals in Savannah and Brunswick remains strong,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “In just two projects announced last year, resin handlers Plastic Express and A&R Logistics will add hundreds of jobs to the Savannah area, nearly 3 million square feet of warehousing, and more than 90,000 TEUs of cargo annually through Garden City Terminal.”

McKnight also noted the Georgia Ports Authority wrapped up a strong Calendar Year 2019, moving a record 4.6 million twenty-foot equivalent container units and 38.5 million tons of cargo.

The 52nd annual Georgia Foreign Trade Conference runs through Feb. 4. The conference showcases Georgia’s benefits to hundreds of attendees from senior level shippers to maritime executives, senior managers and decision-makers representing maritime logistics, railroads, motor carriers, warehousing, cargo owners and other stakeholders critical to the movement of international freight.

“Presenters at this year’s event include some of the top minds in global logistics today, addressing the key challenges and market opportunities our industry will face over the next decade,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Through networking and formal sessions, the GFTC gives logistics professionals a chance to learn from the best in the business.”

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855

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GPA set to exceed 4.6M TEUs

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GPA set to exceed 4.6M TEUs
Rail cargo leaps 30 percent in three years
 
 
The Port of Savannah’s Mason Mega Rail Terminal Phase I will open in the spring of 2020. Intermodal rail cargo is growing twice as fast as Georgia Ports’ overall container trade. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority/Jeremy Polston)
 
SAVANNAH, Ga., Dec. 3, 2019- The Georgia Ports Authority is on track to exceed 4.6 million twenty-foot equivalent container units for the first time in a calendar year.
 
That level of trade would be a 14 percent increase over volumes moved through Savannah just three years ago, or an additional 550,000 TEUs. Over the same period, the Authority has increased the annual capacity at the Port of Savannah from 5 million to 5.5 million TEUs.
 
“Through incredible teamwork from the GPA and the ILA on the docks, to the motor carriers and Class I railroads, and to our partners throughout the supply chain, Georgia has managed to create a powerful hub for commerce that is creating jobs and economic opportunity in every corner of the state,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch.
 
Lynch said to keep cargo flowing, GPA is adding cranes, container rows, truck gates and intermodal capacity.
 
With the first phase of GPA’s Mason Mega Rail project opening this spring, cargo moved by rail has grown twice as fast as the Authority’s overall three-year growth rate in container trade. Over the first 10 months of the year, intermodal volumes expanded by 30 percent, compared to the same period in 2017. The port handled 427,891 rail containers through October, up 98,835 over volumes from three years ago. The new Mason Mega Rail terminal will double Savannah’s on-port rail capacity to 1 million containers per year.
 
“Exciting new business opportunities such as the export of the Georgia-made Kia Telluride, and resins produced in Pennsylvania and the Gulf States, as well as the import of cold-treated fresh produce, are driving the increase in trade through our deepwater ports,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “The speed and efficiency of our terminal operations, as well as our connectivity via road and rail make Georgia the best choice for reliable supply chain services.”
 
For the calendar year-to-date through October, the GPA moved 3.88 million twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 222,800 TEUs or 6 percent, year over year.
 
Total tonnage crossing all GPA terminals reached 32.5 million tons January through October, up 4 percent over 2018, or 1.21 million tons, including containerized, bulk and breakbulk cargo. The Port of Savannah is handling the highest volumes of any container terminal in the U.S. Southeast, moving as many as 8,000 TEUs per ship.
 
In Roll-on/Roll-off cargo, Colonel’s Island Terminal at the Port of Brunswick handled 500,512 units of cars, trucks and tractors from January through October. Ocean Terminal in Savannah added another 37,476 for a total of 537,988 units. Total Ro/Ro trade is up for the year by 3,300 units. Georgia is the second busiest U.S. hub for the import-export of Ro/Ro cargo behind only Baltimore.
 
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

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GPA MARKS BEST OCTOBER EVER

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GPA marks best October ever

At the Port of Savannah, all nine berths are again open for business after Berths 4, 5 and 6 were strengthened to handle Neo-Panamax cranes and vessels. Savannah’s Garden City Terminal serves 37 global container ship services per week. Find print quality images here.  (Georgia Ports Authority /Jeremy Polston)

NEW INFRASTRUCTURE HELPS EXPANDS MARKET SHARE

SAVANNAH, Ga., Nov. 14, 2019 – The Georgia Ports Authority moved 428,400 twenty-foot equivalent container units in October, an increase of 14,600 TEUs or 3.5 percent. The strong month gave the Port of Savannah a fiscal year-to-date total of 1.6 million TEUs, up 90,600, or 6 percent.

“We have seen three years of incredible volume growth, and the economy of the U.S. Southeast remains a powerhouse,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Georgia’s market share continues to expand as new commodities come online and customers in new regions rely on our services.”

In October, A&R Logistics selected the Savannah market for its new global export hub for plastic resins. The 600,000 square-foot packaging facility will be operational by late 2020, with an option to expand up to 1 million square feet. A&R Logistics’ Export Division will also be headquartered in Savannah to support global supply chain development for the chemical industry. In April, Plastic Express announced it is investing $172 million in two resin packaging warehouses in Savannah – each measuring 1 million square feet.

“Savannah is already the port of choice to serve the U.S. Southeast,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “To accommodate future growth, GPA has and continues to make significant infrastructure investments that are allowing the GPA to take on new business, create jobs and economic development across Georgia and beyond.”

For example, all nine berths at Garden City Terminal are now back online after berths 4, 5 and 6 were strengthened to accommodate larger cranes and vessels. The port can now serve three 14,000-TEU and four other Post-Panamax ships simultaneously. Savannah’s ship-to-shore crane fleet will expand by six to 36 in the first half of Calendar Year 2020. Additionally, the Mason Mega Rail Terminal, the nation’s largest on-port rail facility, is more than 50 percent complete.

In Roll-on/Roll-off cargo, Colonel’s Island Terminal at the Port of Brunswick and Ocean Terminal in Savannah handled a total of 63,353 units in October, an increase of 7.8 percent or 4,600 units. For the fiscal year to date, Ro/Ro volumes remained flat at 220,000 units. Georgia is the second busiest U.S. hub for the import-export of Ro/Ro cargo behind only Baltimore.

Total tonnage crossing all GPA terminals reached 13 million tons July through October, up 4.7 percent or 583,500 tons, including containerized, bulk and breakbulk cargo.

 

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

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TOP OFFICIALS THANK COAST GUARD, RESILIENT BRUNSWICK MARITIME COMMUNITY

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Top officials thank Coast Guard,  resilient Brunswick maritime community

The Port of Brunswick moved 614,000 units of Roll-on/Roll-off cargo in Fiscal Year 2019. The Georgia Ports Authority has enough land permitted for expansion to grow capacity to 1.5 million Ro/Ro units per year. Find print quality images here.  (Georgia Ports Authority)

GPA OPENS 40 DOCKSIDE ACRES TO AUTO PROCESSING

SAVANNAH, Ga., Oct. 2, 2019 – At the Brunswick State of the Port address Wednesday, Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch thanked the U.S. Coast Guard, Brunswick Bar Pilots and port workers for their efforts in the crew rescue, ongoing vessel salvage and reopening of the Port of Brunswick after the car carrying ship Golden Ray capsized Sept. 8. 

“The Coast Guard and our Brunswick maritime community came together in an impressive display of teamwork, focused first on the safety of the crew, and now on protecting the natural environment and the safety of vessel operations,” Lynch said. “In only four days, we were able to reopen the port, protecting the livelihoods of our direct employees and thousands of others across the region. On behalf of the Georgia Ports Authority, I would like to thank all those involved in the rescue and salvage operations.” 

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Norm Witt of the Marine Safety Unit in Savannah and Captain John Reed are to be commended for the Coast Guard’s quick rescue of the ship’s crew and river pilot, and for their continuing work to restore normal operations.

“I applaud the quick action of the Coast Guard, tugs, maritime engineers and emergency responders in the rescue of the ship’s entire crew and the river pilot on the Golden Ray,” Kemp said. “We all felt tremendous relief as the last sailor was brought to safety. Now that the mission has shifted to recovery, we appreciate the Coast Guard’s efforts to accommodate river traffic while salvagers work to right the vessel and clear the channel. The Port of Brunswick is an important asset to Georgia, supporting employment across an array of industries.”

Port activity in Glynn and the five surrounding counties supports nearly 11,000 jobs in business sectors such as forest products, automobile processing, retail and other services according to an economic impact study conducted by the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business. Statewide, Georgia’s deepwater ports support more than 440,000 full- and part-time jobs, yielding $25 billion in personal income each year. 

The growth at Colonel’s Island autoport is thanks in part to its logistical advantage, including immediate access to Interstate 95, and from there, I-10 and I-16. 

“Brunswick’s proximity to Southeastern dealerships and auto manufacturers, combined with its ability to reach important inland markets via CSX and Norfolk Southern, makes it an ideal hub for the import-export of vehicles,” said GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight. “Service from nine ocean carriers means Brunswick has the global connections to efficiently move exports and imports.”

 

During the event hosted by the Brunswick Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce, Lynch also announced the development of a 40-acre dockside parcel dedicated to auto processing at the Roll-on/Roll-off port at Colonel’s Island Terminal. “Construction is complete and the new space is now open for Ro/Ro operations,” Lynch said. “With this expansion, the Port of Brunswick is ready to take on substantial new business.”

The development increases the car storage area by approximately 6,000 spaces, and provides a 9-acre staging area for high and heavy equipment being loaded or unloaded from vessels. The benefits will include additional capacity and speedier vessel processing. 

The new dockside expansion will increase GPA’s rail capacity for autos at Brunswick, adding 14,100 feet of track. This, in turn, will allow Brunswick to expand service in markets west of the Mississippi River and into the American Midwest. In FY2019, more than 110,000 vehicles were transported to inland markets from Brunswick by rail.

GPA has also added a second access road between the docks and the island’s south side. This provides a more direct route to existing auto processing lots and new development on the south end of the terminal. 

Also at the Brunswick State of the Port, Lynch thanked BMW for signing a new 20-year contract to move vehicles through Colonel’s Island Terminal. The German carmaker has tapped Georgia Ports for vehicle logistics since 1988. In the last 15 years, BMW has moved 612,000 vehicles via Brunswick.

In FY2019, the Port of Brunswick handled a total of nearly 614,000 units of Roll-on/Roll-off cargo, an increase of 4 percent, or 23,000 units. Including the 36,000 units moved via Ocean Terminal in Savannah, Georgia is the second busiest hub for the import-export of vehicles, machinery and other types of Ro/Ro cargo in the U.S.

At East River Terminal in Brunswick, terminal operator Logistec moved 1.2 million tons of bulk cargo in FY2019, an increase of 203,000 tons, or 20 percent. The improvement was largely associated with an increase in wood pellets, peanut pellets and perlite.

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Chief Communications Officer Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

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Savannah continues to build container volumes

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NEWS
 
Garden City Terminal marks cargo gains 34 out of past 36 months
 
 
The Port of Savannah’s Garden City Terminal has handled nearly 2 million twenty-foot equivalent container units in the first five months of Fiscal Year 2020. Find print quality images here.(Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)
 
SAVANNAH, Ga., Nov. 10, 2019- The Port of Savannah moved 363,000 twenty-foot equivalent container units in November, a 5.4 percent increase over the same month last year, or an additional 18,460 TEUs. For the fiscal year to date (July-November), the Georgia Ports Authority has handled nearly 2 million TEUs, an increase of 109,000 TEUs, or 5.8 percent.
 
The positive numbers achieved last month mean Savannah’s Garden City Terminal has marked year-over-year increases for five consecutive months, and 34 out of the past 36 months.
 
“After nearly three full years of cargo growth, with dozens of monthly records, it is frankly surprising to see our numbers continue to grow upon such a large base,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “The streamlined movement of containers from vessel to departing rail in 24 hours and capacity increases built into Garden City Terminal have helped to increase volumes and improve efficiency.”
 
GPA Board Chairman Will McKnight added that the Authority’s Mid-American Arc initiative, targeting markets from Memphis to Chicago and the Ohio River Valley, is also starting to pay dividends with customers moving more cargo in direct shipments from Savannah to the Midwest.
 
“Chicago plays such an important role in the nation’s logistics, not only as a major market, but also as a cargo hub,” McKnight said. “Breaking into that market with a new routing option that provides Savannah’s world-class terminal efficiency and customer service holds amazing potential to win new business. With all the opportunities before us, it’s a great time to be a Georgian.”
 
In Roll-on/Roll-off traffic, Colonel’s Island at the Port of Brunswick and Ocean Terminal in Savannah moved a combined 62,146 units of cars, trucks and heavy equipment in November, an increase of 5 percent, or 2,850 units. GPA has handled 281,547 Ro/Ro units, up 2,030 units or approximately 1 percent, through the first five months of the fiscal year.
 
 
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 439,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $25 billion in income, $106 billion in revenue and $2.9 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.5 percent of U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in FY2017.

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