PORT PLAN TO REDUCE GARDEN CITY TRAIN CROSSINGS

Savannah, Ga. – March 1, 2017 – At a public meeting Tuesday, representatives from Garden City, Chatham County and the Georgia Ports Authority discussed a proposal that would greatly reduce the use of rail crossings around Garden City Terminal, while increasing capacity and jobs for the local community.

The meeting focused on installation of an overpass at State Route 25. The road improvement will take vehicular traffic over planned new rail lines and Pipemakers Canal. It is proposed in conjunction with an on-terminal project that will double GPA’s rail capacity to 1 million containers per year. The new port infrastructure will remove the need to stop trains off terminal to switch rail cars, an activity which has impacted traffic on commuter routes.

 “While this project is important to the port’s business, it will greatly improve the safety and flow of traffic on major thoroughfares like Highway 21 and Main Street in Garden City,” said Mayor Don Bethune. “Moving rail switching onto Garden City Terminal will drastically reduce rail-related traffic delays for commuters and local residents.”

The changes are part of a rail expansion that will enable the GPA to better accommodate 10,000-foot long unit trains and double rail capacity without increasing truck traffic.

“Not only will this new infrastructure reduce the impact of rail cargo movements in our community, it will also help us to alleviate future truck traffic as more of our containers move by rail,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Our area will also see economic benefits, as additional intermodal capacity will create new employment opportunities on terminal and throughout the local logistics and supply chain.”

The project, dubbed the Savannah International Multi-Modal Connector, will build density into the system, and enable rail providers CSX and Norfolk Southern to deliver faster, more frequent rail service to markets ranging from Memphis to Chicago and the Ohio Valley.

Currently, 19 percent of containerized cargo moves by rail at the Port of Savannah. The expansion is geared in part toward increasing the share of cargo that moves by rail at Garden City Terminal.

The development will be partially funded by a $44 million federal Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) grant, with the remaining $84 million covered by the GPA, Genesee & Wyoming Railroad, and Chatham County. The projected completion date is in 2021.

“Expanding rail capacity and service for our customers enhances our ability to support global competitiveness for American businesses, while also improving quality of life for our neighbors in Garden City,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “The project is truly a win-win situation for commerce and the community.”

 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

PORT AUTHORITIES OF GEORGIA AND VIRGINIA FILE EAST COAST GATEWAY TERMINAL AGREEMENT

 

Port Authorities of Georgia and Virginia File East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement 
 
 

JOINT NEWS RELEASE


Georgia Ports Authority
Contact: Robert Morris
Senior Director of Corporate Communications
(912) 964-3855 / Office
(912) 657-4220 / Cell
rmorris@gaports.com

 

The Port of Virginia
Contact: Joseph Harris
Senior Director, Media Relations & Spokesperson
(757) 683-2137 / Office
(757) 675-8087/ Cell
jharris@portofvirginia.com

     

Port Authorities of Georgia and Virginia
File East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement

SAVANNAH, GA and NORFOLK, VA – The Georgia Ports Authority and the Virginia Port Authority filed on Friday, Feb. 24, 2017, with the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) to create the “East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement.”

The agreement encourages voluntary cooperation in the areas of operational and supply chain efficiencies, safety, communications and customer service.

“The U.S. East Coast continues to see larger vessels and cargo exchanges since the opening of the expanded Panama Canal last year,” VPA CEO and Executive Director John Reinhart and GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch said in a joint statement. “Increasingly, our customers are seeking gateway ports on the East Coast that can leverage sufficient landside infrastructure to ensure the free flow of cargo. The states of Georgia and Virginia have made the necessary investments to prepare for this new era in global trade. The East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement is an innovative collaboration that will allow us to find new ways to become more efficient and effective.”

The agreement will enable the member ports to work together to find ways to become more efficient and effective, which will benefit the citizens of their respective states, as well as shippers and the carriers.

Additional areas of cooperation between the GPA and VPA include acquisition and utilization of joint marketing materials and sharing best practices in areas such as terminal operating systems, training, cargo handling, access, turn-times and infrastructure, as well as supporting the promotion of all-water routes from the U.S. East Coast to the international marketplace via the Panama Canal.

Georgia and Virginia are not the first terminal operators to file with the FMC to share information. In December 2016, APM Terminals, DP World, Hutchinson Port Holdings, PSA International, Shanghai International Port (Group) Co., and the Port of Rotterdam Authority filed the “Global Ports Group Agreement” with the Federal Maritime Commission to promote the efficiency and effectiveness of the container port industry. 

###

Find print-quality portraits of Griff Lynch and John Reinhart here

About Georgia Ports Authority
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

About The Port of Virginia
The Virginia Port Authority (VPA) is a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Virginia. The VPA owns and through its private operating subsidiary, Virginia International Terminals, LLC (VIT), operates four general cargo facilities Norfolk International Terminals, Portsmouth Marine Terminal, Newport News Marine Terminal and the Virginia Inland Port in Warren County. The VPA leases Virginia International Gateway and Richmond Marine Terminal. In fiscal year 2013, The Port of Virginia provided more than 374,000 jobs and generated $60.3 billion in total economic impact throughout the Commonwealth.

GEORGIA PORTS MARK BUSIEST MONTH EVER

Georgia Ports mark busiest month ever

SET TONNAGE, CONTAINER RECORDS IN JANUARY

 
 The Ports of Savannah and Brunswick achieved a 26 percent increase in total tonnage in January, compared to the same month last year. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 Savannah, Ga. – February 23, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority achieved outstanding January results, with double-digit growth across all business sectors and a 26 percent increase in total tonnage. 

“The Port of Savannah is unrivaled in its connectivity into the heartland of the U.S. and the service excellence that port customers enjoy,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “With on-terminal efficiencies bolstered by interstates within minutes of the port and the fastest westward rail transit in the South Atlantic region, Garden City Terminal provides more reliable, more cost effective freight movement.” 

Lynch credited those supply chain efficiencies for the record 3 million tons of cargo GPA moved in January, up 623,504 tons compared to the same month a year ago. 

Containerized trade saw strong growth, with 331,468 twenty-foot equivalent units crossing the docks at the Port of Savannah, up 16.2 percent, or 46,167 TEUs. Of that trade, loaded containers accounted for approximately 268,000 TEUs, also a record. 

The increase in loaded containers contributed to an improvement in container tonnage of 22.1 percent (465,710 tons), for a total of 2.57 million tons for the month. 

At the Port of Brunswick, bulk cargo more than doubled to 235,802 tons in January, an increase of 125,998 tons. Meanwhile, breakbulk cargo handled at Ocean Terminal in Savannah and at the Mayor’s Point and Colonel’s Island terminals in Brunswick grew by 17.7 percent to 211,575 tons, an increase of 31,796 tons. 

Roll-on/Roll-off trade improved by 7 percent, with 52,778 units of cars, trucks and tractors moving across GPA docks in January, an increase of 3,389 vehicles compared to last year. 

“The phenomenal growth at Georgia’s ports speaks to the powerful, vibrant economy of Georgia and the Southeastern U.S.,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “As we continue to expand our transportation infrastructure through a deeper harbor, the largest crane fleet of any U.S. terminal, unmatched interstate connections and a mega-terminal for rail, you will see our ports continue to capture market share and bring new business to the state.” 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

New Developments Position Savannah as U.S. Gateway Port

 

ANNOUNCEMENT COMES ON THE HEELS OF THREE CONSECUTIVE MONTHS OF RECORD GROWTH 

 
 
Developers have purchased five parcels, totaling 500 acres, within the Savannah River International Trade Park for warehousing and distribution operations. Find print quality images here.

 

Savannah, Ga. – Feb 6, 2017 – Today the Georgia Ports Authority announced the sale of 500 acres of property for commercial development to accommodate growing customer demand for warehousing, distribution and transload facilities near the Port of Savannah.
 
The new development, located on five parcels of land at GPA’s Savannah River International Trade Park, is less than five miles from the Garden City Container Terminal and can accommodate up to 5 million square feet of logistics space.
 
“Today’s announcement will help further establish Savannah as a gateway port for the U.S. Southeast and beyond,” said Executive Director Griff Lynch. “With an increased demand for reliable, cost-effective logistics opportunities, this development is another example of GPA’s focus on supply chain solutions for our customers.”

 

The project is just one mile from I-95 and will help fill a growing need to service a larger range of customers from the Southeast to the Midwest U.S. January was the third month in a row of record performances at the Savannah container port, with the Authority moving 331,190 twenty-foot equivalent container units, an improvement of 16.1 percent (45,889 TEUs).
 
The GPA reported for the month of November a 5.8 percent increase in container traffic, reaching 300,671 TEUs. In December, the Port of Savannah handled 292,172 TEUs, a 12.3 percent increase over December 2015.
 
“The expansion we’re seeing in our container volumes constitutes a strong vote of confidence from our new and longtime port customers,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “Keeping ahead of demand requires infrastructure development in both the public and private sector. The new facilities destined for our trade park are part of that equation. The GPA is also making the on-terminal improvements necessary to stay ahead of demand.”
 
Other efforts to increase capacity at the Georgia Ports Authority include: 
  • A rail expansion project at Garden City Terminal will double the Port of Savannah’s rail lift capacity to 1 million containers per year. A part of GPA’s Mid-American Arc initiative, the expansion will better accommodate 10,000-foot long unit trains. This $128 million project will make routes running deeper into the American Midwest more attractive to rail providers by making more efficient use of rail infrastructure. The Mid-American Arc enhances global trade options for manufacturers in cities such as St. Louis and Chicago – potential customers who might not have considered Savannah previously, despite rail distances comparable to ports in the Northeast. Partially funded by a $44 million federal grant, the project will be complete in 2021.
  • In 2016, GPA added:
    • Four New Panamax ship-to-shore cranes (for a total of 26 cranes) and 20 rubber-tired gantry cranes (total, 146).
    • A new 30-acre empty container yard and an eight-lane truck gate.
    • A six-acre extension of our dockside container yard, adding storage space for 2,850 TEUs directly behind Berth 9 at Garden City Terminal.
  • As part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s major initiative to improve and expand surface transportation across Georgia, the state opened the Jimmy DeLoach Connector in 2016, providing direct truck access between Garden City Terminal and Interstate 95. The connector cuts 11 minutes from the drive time between the port and the interstate.
  • In December, the GPA broke ground on its new inland terminal in Northwest Georgia – the Appalachian Regional Port. GPA estimates the CSX rail route will reduce Atlanta truck traffic by 50,000 moves annually, and expand GPA’s target market in Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky.
  • At the Port of Brunswick, more than 200 acres are in the design or development stages, adding more space for auto processing at Colonel’s Island Terminal.
    • Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics has already occupied 20 of those additional acres, while International Auto Processing has leased another 49.
    • A separate 30-acre parcel should come online this month.
    • The long-term plan is to add 600 acres on the island’s south side to support auto processing, doubling the capacity for cars and heavy machinery in Brunswick.
Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

 

For more information, contact GPA’s Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com. Visit the GPA web site at www.gaports.com

GPA ACHIEVES RECORD, DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH IN DECEMBER

GPA achieves record, double-digit growth in December

GPA ACHIEVES RECORD, DOUBLE-DIGIT GROWTH IN DECEMBER

INLAND TERMINAL BREAKS GROUND

Monday, January 23, 2017/Categories: Ro/Ro Cargo, Container Cargo, Economic Impact, Logistics, Port of Savannah, Port of Brunswick, Site Selection, Press Release

 

December capped a busy year in containerized trade for the Georgia Ports Authority. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority / Stephen B. Morton)

 

Savannah, Ga. – Jan. 23, 2017 – The Georgia Ports Authority marked 12.3 percent container volume growth in December, moving 292,172 twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 32,099 TEUs compared to December 2015, a record for the GPA.

Roll-on/Roll-off cargo mirrored that growth, with a 12.3 percent increase (7,000 units) in passenger vehicles and heavy equipment handled at Colonel’s Island terminal in Brunswick and Ocean Terminal in Savannah. Georgia’s deepwater ports moved 63,967 Ro/Ro units last month.

Executive Director Griff Lynch reported at the Authority board meeting Monday that several factors led to GPA’s December record growth. “Strategic proximity to major population and manufacturing sites, direct interstate access and the most ocean carrier routes in the U.S. Southeast are the competitive advantages drawing customers to our ports,” Lynch said. “As the largest single-terminal operation in the nation, Savannah’s advantages are unmatched in the industry.”

In its effort to stay ahead of demand and accommodate future needs, the GPA broke ground last month on its new inland terminal in Northwest Georgia – the Appalachian Regional Port. Port officials estimate the CSX rail route will reduce Atlanta truck traffic by 50,000 moves annually, and expand GPA’s target market in Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky. Each container moved by rail from the inland terminal will offset 355 truck miles on Georgia highways.

“GPA’s track record of operational excellence over the past decade more than prepares it to achieve great things at the Appalachian Regional Port,” said Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “This is the next step in our transition, moving additional cargo to rail, allowing more capacity on our interstates, and extending GPA’s competitive benefits farther into the American heartland.”

Inland terminal construction is expected to take just under two years, with the start of operations at the ARP targeted for the third quarter of calendar year 2018.

Allgood said the new inland terminal will make goods manufactured within its service region — such as flooring, automobiles and tires — more competitive in the global market, while reducing carbon emissions. The ARP’s savings potential has already resulted in companies locating and expanding in Northwest Georgia to take advantage of the inland terminal’s future benefits.

Allgood began the first GPA Board Meeting of 2017 with a moment of silence for Tom J. Mahoney, Jr. who passed away January 20. Mahoney had served as assistant attorney general for the GPA from 1987 until the time of his death. “For nearly three decades, Tom Mahoney helped steer GPA’s growth and success with his wise counsel, knowledge of maritime issues and love of our ports. He will be missed.”  

In other business:

  • The GPA Board approved the purchase of new software to run gate, vessel and rail operations. The system currently in use at GPA has been retired by Navis and replaced by its N4 software. “The new software will have similar functionality, but better engineering and integration,” said Bill Sutton, GPA director of information technology. “Navis’ N4 software now has a successful track record of use in ports across North America.” The software system will be phased in at GPA terminals over an 18-month period.
  • The GPA marked its busiest year ever in loaded container traffic in 2016, moving 2.94 million twenty-foot equivalent container units, an increase of 71,083 TEUs over 2015. Total cargo across all terminals reached 31.22 million tons in the year just ended. Counting loaded and empty containers, the Port of Savannah moved 3.64 million TEUs in calendar year 2016. 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015. 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

FOUR NEW PANAMAX CRANES ARRIVE AT THE PORT OF SAVANNAH

Four New Panamax cranes arrive at the Port  of Savannah

FOUR NEW PANAMAX CRANES ARRIVE AT THE PORT OF SAVANNAH

GEORGIA PORTS AUTHORITY INCREASES SHIP-TO-SHORE FLEET TO 26

Saturday, December 03, 2016/Categories: Cargo Handled, Container Cargo, Logistics, Port of Savannah, Press Release

Rate this article:

3.6

 
 

Boskalis vessel Teal transports four new ship-to-shore cranes up the Savannah River past historic River Street to Garden City Terminal at the Port of Savannah, Monday, Dec. 5, 2016. Find print quality images here.  (Georgia Ports Authority/Stephen B. Morton)

 

Savannah, Ga. – December 5, 2016 – Four new Super Post Panamax ship-to-shore cranes arrived at Garden City Terminal Monday, bringing the Port of Savannah’s total to 26, more than any other terminal in the U.S.

“For customers, it means the capacity to move up to a thousand containers per hour across a single dock at America’s largest terminal – allowing us to work more vessels, more quickly,” said Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch. “It means getting cargo to market and getting ships back out to sea with unmatched efficiency.”

 Designed by Konecranes of Finland, these enormous cranes can work the largest ships calling on the U.S. East Coast, reaching across vessels 22 containers wide.

 “We’re growing our crane fleet in order to stay ahead of demand,” said GPA Chief Operating Officer Ed McCarthy. “Since the opening of the expanded Panama Canal in June, Garden City Terminal has seen a 40 percent increase in the number of vessels carrying 8,000 or more twenty-foot equivalent container units. Over the same period, the Port of Savannah has seen a 21 percent increase in the number of TEUs handled per vessel.”

 Counting the new cranes, Savannah now features 20 New Panamax cranes and six post-panamax cranes (reaching 17 containers across). Another four New Panamax cranes are due to arrive in 2018, bringing Savannah’s total to 30. The cranes operate over a dock with nearly 10,000 feet of contiguous berth space.

The new cranes, along with the Savannah Harbor deepening, help to accommodate a move in the world fleet toward larger ships. Through its expanded locks, the Panama Canal can now accommodate vessels with a capacity of 14,000 TEUs – nearly triple the size of the canal’s previous maximum. This opens an important new route for the more efficient ships to serve the U.S. East Coast.

Port officials said the improvements to the Port of Savannah’s crane fleet demonstrate the GPA’s commitment to expand capacity, providing more opportunities for growth and greater flexibility to meet customer needs.

“Garden City Terminal completes 100,000 container transactions every week,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “Keeping all those transactions moving smoothly requires the authority to maintain capacity at least 20 percent above demand. Our new cranes help to ensure the terminal remains congestion-free and efficient for customers.”

 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GPA COMPLETES LATEST FUEL-SAVING ERTG PHASE

 

KONECRANES MARKS MAJOR MILESTONE IN SAVANNAH

Wednesday, November 16, 2016/Categories: Sustainability, Logistics, Facilities, Port of Savannah, Press Release

  

Officials from Konecranes and the Georgia Ports Authority commemorated the 1,000th rubber-tired gantry crane produced by the company, and completion of the latest phase of GPA’s electric RTG infrastructure. The eRTGs use 95 percent less diesel than standard RTGs, saving on fuel costs and emissions. Find print quality images here. (Stephen Morton/Georgia Ports Authority)

Savannah, Ga. – Nov. 15, 2016 – At an event commemorating the 1,000th rubber-tired gantry crane produced by Konecranes, the Georgia Ports Authority announced the completion of the latest phase of its electric RTG infrastructure. 

“We’re excited to expand on our eRTG program, the first of its kind at a North American port,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “As part of a decade-long initiative promoting sustainable operations, this technology further establishes GPA’s role as an environmental leader in the logistics industry.”

Electric RTGs use up to 95 percent less diesel fuel than conventional RTGs. GPA is in the process of electrifying its entire fleet, which will number 170 RTGs by 2026. With the completion of Phase 3, 45 out of the current 146 RTGs have been transitioned from diesel to electric power or purchased with electric power capability. The eRTGs currently in operation allow the GPA to avoid the use of approximately 700,000 gallons of diesel per year, for a savings of $2.2 million. 

Once the entire fleet is converted, the Authority will see annual savings of approximately 3 million gallons of diesel. At full build-out the system will lower fuel and maintenance costs by $11 million annually, even after factoring in the purchase of electricity.

Earlier this year, the Environmental Protection Agency highlighted the GPA as “a leading advocate of environmental stewardship,” and granted the Authority its 2016 Clean Air Technology Award. The GPA was one of only six individuals or organizations across the country to receive such recognition. 

“I appreciate how the GPA has worked closely with us to constantly improve our crane design,” said Konecranes Sales and Marketing Director Tuomas Saastamoinen, noting the company delivered its first RTG to the Port of Savannah in 1995.  “It is wonderful to have delivered our 1000th RTG to the GPA in 2016.” 

GPA implemented its electric rubber tired gantry crane program in 2012 as part of a consistent effort to reduce emissions at Garden City Terminal. 

“The GPA’s commitment to sustainable practices is not only good for the environment and quality of life, it’s good for business,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood.

In other projects, the GPA has installed 104 refrigerated container racks – more than any other U.S. terminal – to transition those containers from diesel generators to electricity. Through efforts such as this and electrifying ship-to-shore cranes, the Port of Savannah avoids the use of more than 7.5 million gallons of diesel annually. 

In the area of water quality, the authority preserves 300 acres of natural wetlands in Brunswick, and has established 14 acres of wetlands at the Port of Savannah for its natural filtering capability. The man-made wetlands on Garden City Terminal treat 100 million gallons of storm water annually, protecting the Savannah River. 

The GPA also protects and maintains dozens of old growth oak trees in Savannah and Brunswick. Garden City Terminal features about a dozen trees that are more than 200 years old, two of which arborists estimate are more than 365 years old. 

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GEORGIA’S PORTS NOW FULLY OPERATIONAL

Georgia’s ports now fully operational

 

Wednesday, October 12, 2016/Categories: Refrigerated Cargo, Ro/Ro Cargo, Container Cargo, Heavy Lift, Reefer, Economic Impact, Port of Savannah, Site Selection, Press Release

 
 

The container ship MSC Kleven sails up river to the Port of Savannah after the Savannah River reopened following Hurricane Matthew in Savannah, Ga., Wednesday, Oct.12, 2016. Nine vessels worked at the Garden City Terminal on Wednesday. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority/Stephen B. Morton)

 

Savannah, Ga. – Oct. 12, 2016 – The Savannah River channel reopened for commercial traffic Wednesday morning at 7 a.m. with 11 vessels transiting the channel by mid-afternoon, nine of which will be worked at Garden City Terminal and two at Ocean Terminal. 

“Georgia’s ports are now fully operational which is a testament to the efforts of countless individuals to ensure our port customers experienced minimal impact,” said Griff Lynch, Executive Director for the Georgia Ports Authority. “We would like to thank our many service providers, port stakeholders, first responders, GPA employees and Governor Nathan Deal’s Office for working around the clock to bring the ports of Brunswick and Savannah back online so quickly.” 

By the end of the day, the Garden City Terminal was working nine vessels, moving nearly 800 containers per hour, with an anticipated 7,800 container moves for the day.

“Of all the ports affected by Hurricane Matthew, the Port of Savannah was hit the hardest,” said U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Amy Beach, Marine Safety Unit Savannah Commander. “I know how vital the Port of Savannah is to the nation, and fully reopening the port was my top priority.”

Because the full force of the storm struck Savannah’s outer harbor, aids to navigation were severely compromised.

“I want to sincerely thank Commander Amy Beach and especially Rear Admiral Scott Buschman for personally interceding to expedite the repairs necessary to restore this channel.” 

Hundreds of GPA employees were on terminals in both Brunswick and Savannah the day after the storm restoring power, working with emergency responders and testing systems to ensure the safe return of thousands of port users.

The gates at Garden City Terminal are projected to process more than 8,500 truck moves today, Wednesday, Oct. 12. That number is expected to grow throughout this week and into next week. Lynch encouraged the local trucking community to take advantage of this Saturday’s regularly scheduled gate hours.

“During peak season, we understand this is a critical time for port users’ supply chain in the U.S. Southeast and Mid-West,” said Lynch. “Everyone involved did a phenomenal job bringing the port back to normal operations.”

As the largest single-terminal container facility in the nation and more than 9,700 feet of contiguous berthing space and 22 ship-to-shore cranes, Savannah was able to quickly recover from the storm with minimal impact to the supply chain.

“Hurricane Matthew demonstrated the ability of our team to rise to the occasion and the incredible resiliency of our ports to efficiently handle large volumes in difficult circumstances,” said Lynch.

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

GPA ADDING 100 ACRES OF AUTO PROCESSING SPACE

GPA adding 100 acres of auto processing space

 

LOGISTEC OPENS 221K SQUARE FEET OF NEW WOOD PELLET CAPACITY

Wednesday, October 05, 2016/Categories: Breakbulk Cargo, Heavy Lift, Economic Impact, Logistics, Port of Brunswick, Press Release

 
 

The Port of Brunswick is the nation’s fastest growing autoport.  With 652 acres of auto processing space available for development, Brunswick is poised for continued expansion. Find print quality images here. (Georgia Ports Authority/Jim Carswell)

Brunswick, Ga. – Oct. 5, 2016 – At the annual State of the Port address hosted by the Brunswick-Golden Isles Chamber of Commerce Wednesday, Georgia Ports Authority Executive Director Griff Lynch announced a 100-acre expansion of the Colonel’s Island auto terminal, and welcomed Logistec’s announcement of the completion of 221,000 square feet of wood pellet storage at GPA’s East River Terminal.

“The additional 100 acres will allow GPA to grow along with our existing customers, and to attract additional carmakers to the nation’s second busiest auto port,” Lynch said. “This new roll-on/roll-off capacity is part of an initiative to service a growing market, while staying 20 percent ahead of our current demand.” 

Twenty of the 100 acres are paved and in use by Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics, while International Auto Processing has leased another 49 acres it will occupy by May 2017. Just last month, the GPA Board of Directors approved the development of a separate 30-acre parcel, which should come online in January. 

“The Port of Brunswick already supports 9,000 jobs in Glynn and its five surrounding counties,” said GPA Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood. “Our efforts to accommodate the demands of auto manufacturers serving the Southeastern U.S. economy will create jobs and business opportunities within this region.”

The long-term plan for Colonel’s Island’s south side, detailed at today’s State of the Port, will eventually add 540 acres in GPA-owned land to the auto processing operation. Another 140 south side acres owned by Mercedes and International Auto Processing brings Brunswick’s total vehicle space to 1,039 acres. “No other autoport in the nation even approaches that capacity,” Lynch said.

Also at the State of the Port, Lynch announced that Logistec, an international terminal operating company, has just opened two new warehouses totaling 221,675 square feet for wood pellet storage along the Brunswick River.

“These modern buildings are a part of Logistec’s commitment to upgrade and expand its dry bulk facilities in Brunswick. Our terminal is ideally suited to biomass cargo handling, and we look forward to working with the Georgia Ports Authority and our customers to meet long-term growth demands,” said Madeleine Paquin, President and CEO of Logistec. “We are committed to doing business here for the long term. With the addition of these warehouses, we can store higher volumes and have increased our throughput capacity.”

The state-of-the-art facilities opened this week are expected to handle more than 600,000 tons of wood pellets annually. The new buildings represent a 101 percent increase in capacity over two previous warehouses that totaled 110,000 square feet.

The wood pellets are a renewable biomass fuel source shipped largely to Northern Europe, where they are used in energy production. The pellets are sourced mainly from the Georgia forestry industry. This improved infrastructure will aid GPA’s efforts to support Georgia’s forest products sector.

In other news:

  • Lynch reported that in the past fiscal year, the ports authority completed an 8,700-foot rail expansion at Anguilla Junction, for a total of 39,000 feet of track. The added track will provide greater flexibility and storage capacity to build longer trains carrying exponentially more cargo.
  • With a 10-year compound annual growth rate of 11.9 percent, compared to the national CAGR of 2.6 percent (FY2006 to FY2016), Colonel’s Island is the fastest growing autoport in the U.S.
  • Fiscal Year 2016 was the fourth straight year that auto volumes in Brunswick topped 600,000 units. Brunswick Ro/Ro units totaled 621,934 in FY2016. Another 41,323 moved via Ocean Terminal in Savannah.
  • The Port of Brunswick’s total cargo in FY2016 was 2.8 million tons.
    • Colonel’s Island: 1,753,128
    • East River tonnage: 929,230
    • Mayor’s Point: 161,333

Find print-quality images of port operations here. Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015. 

For more information, visit gaports.com, or contact GPA Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com.

DEAL ANNOUNCES KIA, RAIL PROVIDER PARTNERSHIP

 

 

 

CORDELE INTERMODAL SERVICES TO HANDLE KIA PARTS IMPORTED VIA GPA

 

 
 Deal announces Kia, rail provider partnership
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal announced Wednesday that Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia has partnered with Cordele Intermodal Services to move cargo by rail from the Port of Savannah to the CIS container yard in Cordele.  Above, Gov. Deal, center left, is joined by CIS President Jonathan Lafevers, Georgia Rep. Buddy Harden, KMMG Chief Administrative Officer Stuart C. Countess, Georgia Ports Authority Board Chairman Jimmy Allgood, and GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch at the rail yard, with finished vehicles on display. The arrangement with CIS saves transit costs for Kia Motors, while cutting millions of truck miles from state highways each year. Find print quality images here . (Georgia Ports Authority Photo/Stephen B. Morton)

 

For immediate release                                                                                             Office of Communications
Aug 3, 2016                                                                                                                (404) 651-7774

Deal announces Kia, rail provider partnership
Cordele Intermodal Services to handle Kia parts imported via GPA

Gov. Nathan Deal today announced that Cordele Intermodal Services (CIS), Georgia’s first inland terminal, will partner with Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia (KMMG), to handle up to 30,000 TEU containers per year to supply the Kia manufacturing plant in West Point. This partnership will save more than 6 million truck miles each year.

 

“Kia has been a remarkably successful economic driver for West Point and Georgia’s inland terminals provide a new efficient way for companies to transport goods throughout the state,” said Deal. “This partnership and use of the inland port will reduce congestion on our highways and lower transportation costs, using new infrastructure to benefit both companies and the West Point area. The inland rail yards enable Georgia companies to grow to meet the demands of the Southeastern states, while bolstering economic development across the state.”

 

With this new partnership, KMMG will move auto parts via rail from the Port of Savannah to the inland terminal in Cordele and then to West Point via motor carrier.

 

“Working with our state partners, as well as our suppliers, in this way not only benefits KMMG, but also increases efficiency, which adds value to the end product, ultimately benefiting our customers,” said Stuart C. Countess, chief administrative officer of KMMG. “We see this as another example of our company philosophy of continuous improvement.”

 

KMMG currently employs more than 3,000 team members at the West Point location. Together with local suppliers, Kia has created more than 15,000 jobs in the area. Following a $100 million expansion project in 2011, the plant has a production capacity of 360,000 vehicles per year.

 

“There is a direct cost savings to the importer,” said CIS President Jonathan Lafevers. “Furthermore, storage and handling fees are reduced or completely eliminated by utilizing Cordele as the origin and destination location for the containers.”

 

On July 22, the Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) Board of Directors, in conjunction with the state of Georgia, approved $19.7 million to fund the state’s second inland terminal – the Appalachian Regional Port in Murray County. 

 

“Cargo can be loaded onto trains, moving hundreds of containers in a single trip, staged at an intermodal yard, then trucked for much shorter distances,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “This model drives out waste and redundancy in the supply chain, delivering greater efficiency for customers and environmental benefits through reduced diesel consumption.”

 

Previously, the automaker would have trucked containers from Savannah to West Point. This agreement allows trucks carrying Kia parts to make much shorter hauls between Cordele and West Point.

 

Cordele Inland Terminal, served by short line rail providers, currently operates on 40 acres with an option to expand on additional available land nearby. Service areas include southwest Georgia, southern Alabama and western Florida. Cordele was recently designated as an official container yard by shipping lines Maersk, NYK, CMA-CGM, MSC and ZIM which will save time and transportation costs for port customers.

  

Alyssa Botts

 

John Vaughan

Georgia’s deepwater ports and inland barge terminals support more than 369,000 jobs throughout the state annually and contribute $20.4 billion in income, $84.1 billion in revenue and $2.3 billion in state and local taxes to Georgia’s economy. The Port of Savannah handled 8.2 percent of the U.S. containerized cargo volume and 10.3 percent of all U.S. containerized exports in CY2015.
 
For more information, contact GPA’s Senior Director of Corporate Communications Robert Morris at (912) 964-3855 or rmorris@gaports.com. Visit the GPA web site at www.gaports.com.